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JazzUSA.Com – November 2000 November 20, 2000

JazzUsa.com
by Raymond Redmond

Soul Cloud

Soul Cloud

This second album from bassist Joseph Patrick Moore is good. Not superior, but solid. The first song Datz It starts out a little weak, but by the end it is full and jumping. Then comes Ashes to Ashes and you begin to think there may be something here. The keyboard work of Bill Anschell and Vance Thompson’s horn work shine here, as they do throughout the CD, and Jimmy Herring plays a wicked guitar solo in the middle.

After Big Butt Bass, a 27 second song/solo by Moore on his bass, comes the title tune. Perhaps there is a melodic harmonic intent here, but it gets by me. I found the song to be interesting but pretty atonal. It has some great horn work in it, but it would not be my choice for a title tune. After another interlude, this one a 1-1/2 minute drum-centric piece dedicated to Tony Williams, Moore comes back strong and funky on Mumphis Cosanostra. Sort of retro, this is one of the better songs on the CD, and it again features strong horn lines and some groovin keyboard lines by Anschell.

The bass throughout the album is strong and rhythmic, Moore definitely has his own style. Cosmic Dance  is even more retro with it’s Chicago-esque horn lines and hammond-ish keyboards. Goin’ to California is the obligatory ‘this is my album and I’m gonna do a mostly solo song to show off my chops’ song. Stanley Clarke does it all the time, and Moore is good enough to pull it off. The CD ends up with a lively rendition of the classic pop tune ‘Dust in the Wind’, which has more of those odd harmonies that bothered me on the title track. There is also a hiddentrack at the ten minutes mark o f ‘Dust’ (which fades after three minutes or so). It’s a rainy day kind of thing that is better than some of the noted songs on the CD.

With Soul Cloud, Joseph Patrick Moore has brought together some good musicians and put together a release that is a step up into the big time. A little more polish here and there, less of that odd harmony and Joseph Patrick Moore will be a major player in the Jazz world.

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Talkbass – November 2000 November 13, 2000

Talkbass, November 2000
Review by June Rhee
www.talkbass.com

Soul Cloud

Soul Cloud

The first image that came to mind when I listened to SoulCloud, which features bassist Joseph Patrick Moore’s original compositions, was a swank nightclub patroned by hipsters cloaked in black leather at some unidentified New York venue. Tipping its hat to 1970s funk, this CD contains talented musicians and tight ensemble work, both of which are further strengthened by a quality recording. Solo highlights include trumpeter Vance Thompson on track 4, pianist Bill Anschell on track 2, and drummer Phillip Smith on track 5, not to mention Moore’s own bass prowess, which he shows off on an intense bass solo that evokes memoirs of Seinfeldesque city streets entitled BIG BUTT BASS. The name yells it all.

This is a strong CD, much to Moore’s credit. However, while swank isn’t necessarily a bad image, nearly 9 tracks of it does lend itself to leaving the listener rather musically parched. The instrumentation on 6 of the 9 tracks – bass, guitar, brass, drums, keyboards has little variation, and the structure of the pieces felt rather convoluted at times until the solos kicked in. The ensemble in general lacked a certain spark, incited when the members click perfectly together on a personal and musical level.  Rather, I heard several talented musicians playing different instruments at the same time. Perhaps on the next CD Moore can experiment with his setup through utilizing a smaller group of musicians or varying the instrumentation on more tracks.

Moore’s arrangement of GOING TO CALIFORNIA was beautiful, providing a welcome respite from the dark, underground atmosphere of the earlier tracks. Most worthy of note was his jazzed-up arrangement of DUST IN THE WIND, to be avoided by any of you Kansas purists out there. I, on the other hand, highly enjoyed the brisk, sunny-side-up mood.

These shortcomings did little to detract from my coffee and Nutella morning ritual, however. I indeed look forward to and hope to hear more of this bassist’s creations.

 

Inside Savannah – November 2000 November 1, 2000

Inside Savannah , November 2000
Review by Jeff McDermott

Soul Cloud

Soul Cloud

 

What does a bassist do when he’s leading the session? Stay in the rhythm section and you’re too subdued. Work the front of the arrangement and you’re showboating. Moore, a former member of Col. Bruce Hampton’s groups the Fiji Mariners and Planet Zambee tries to ride the fence on his second solo CD. It’s mostly a mainstream jazz effort, showing some tasteful interplay with bass and brass on cuts like DATZ IT. Things dangerously approach fusion when guests like guitarist Jimmy Herring does the yank-me-crank-me on ASHES TO ASHES (not the Bowie song). Fans of Joseph’s long-strange-trip workouts with the Col. might find this a nice CD to play during dinner.

 

 
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