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Iowa State Daily – March 2004 March 24, 2004

Joseph Patrick Moore’s Drum and Bass Society
“Volume 1” (Blue Canoe)
Compare to: Stanley Clarke, Fredalba

Review b y  — Dan Hopper

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

Joseph Patrick Moore has once again proven his versatility as a bass player, arranger and composer. Unfortunately, his music is all over the board stylistically, which may lower its appeal.

“Volume 1” is layered with diverse songs, all of which contain complex musical patterns. Moore and his backing musicians groove as hard as George Clinton and Parliament Funkadelic at times, and Moore’s skills on bass are definitely comparable to Funkadelic’s Bootsy Collins.

The songs have a light-hearted enough tone to fit with any jazz listener’s taste, but the superb backbeats give most of the songs a Latin and funk feel.

There is even a hint of some Caribbean and Arabian influences found throughout. “Down Under”, the leadoff track, could not have received a better title. The music sounds like it could fit perfectly with a TV advertisement for a South Pacific Island’s vacation getaway.

The music features shakers, congas, Udu drums, a mandolin, a flute and even a pizza box scraped, tapped and swirled with jazz brushes. The choice of instruments is innovative, though slightly unconventional.

“Ghost Town” starts out with a few bone-chilling screams. The lyrics mention a ghost town, but the music brings images of deserts and sandstorms with a little enchantment placed upon them.

“Creatures of Conscience,” a Tony Williams composition, has the strongest groove and features an extremely syncopated jazz-funk drum pattern. Jeff Sipe‘s tom fills, high-hat work and borderline-genius drum solo in this song are admirable, considering his name is one not generally mentioned outside of jazz and funk musician circles.

“Creatures Of Conscience” is a good song, but it doesn’t seem to fit with the rest of Moore’s album. He is a bassist and the track obviously features the drums. The bass is barely noticeable.

This is without question a “musician’s album,” meaning the people who would buy it would most likely be musicians who are deeply versed in complicated musical styles or those with a deep love for groove-oriented music or appreciation in general.

 

WCJZ – March 2004 March 15, 2004

WCJZ March 2004
Review by Smooth Zippy
WCJZ Site

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

Joseph Patrick Moore has done it again with another hit CD. GROOVE MESSENGER…a groove that gets your feet tapping and if you listen close a bit of Miles
comes out in this track. This is one of my favorite tracks on the CD. CREATURES OF CONSCIENCE…A little of the old and a splash of the new.  An upbeat sound that’s just plain cool. DOWN UNDER…Vocal Talent Temple Passmore gives this Men at Work hit a new smooth sound.

The CD is a mix of jazz, World, Pop, and a jazzy Rock Sound.

A must have CD in your collection.

 

Smother.net – March 2004 March 7, 2004

Joseph Patrick Moore - Drum & Bass Society Vol. 1 Editor's Pick

Joseph Patrick Moore — Drum & Bass Society Vol. 1

Starting things off with “Down Under” by Men at Work, Joseph Patrick Moore also retools work by The Fixx, The Specials (“Ghost Town”), Phish (“Heavy Things”), and Tony Williams (“Creatures of Conscience”), while offering seven originals. I really dig his funky cover of The Fixx’s “One Thing Leads to Another”, which makes you remember how much great music the ‘80’s and early ‘90s had to offer. His style is jazzy progressive rock with a nod to world and funk. His bass playing is masterful and bouncy with lively tones.

Reviewed by:  J-Sin

 

CelebrityCafe.com – March 2004 March 4, 2004

 

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

 

At first, I admit I practically threw this CD to the side. It came in a beaten envelope redirected from an address six years out of date. The CD itself looks like its seen better days and after being redirected based on the condition of the envelope I could have sworn that it was a bomb. Then I saw that this jazz band covered “Down Under” by Men at Work. Okay, they also covered Phish and the Fixx, but it was the Men at Work that struck me. Who the heck would cover that song? Especially as jazz. 

Then the vocals started, and the beat, and the drums, and the bass. The song blew me away more than the original. Simply incredible. I’m glad that the album finally made it to us, and now I repeat this one song ad nauseum throughout the office. 

Reviewer: Michael 
Reviewer’s Rating: 7.5

 

HotBands.com – March 2004 March 1, 2004

hotbands.com

Joseph Patrick Moore’s Drum & Bass Society Vol 1. – CD Review
By Patrick Ferris

 

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

 

 

Joseph Patrick Moore aka JPM is a bass virtuoso originally from Knoxville, Tennessee, now residing in Atlanta, Georgia. The winner of multiple national awards and scholarships for music excellence, JPM’s musical track record reads like a who’s who of the jazz world, and has made him one of the most sought-after studio bassists on the East Coast.

JPM’s most recent CD, Drum & Bass Society Vol 1. is an eclectic selection of arrangements in the genre of fusion jazz. JPM has assembled some of the finest studio heavies to create what I would call ‘A Musician’s Album’. Drum & Bass Society Vol 1. might be beyond the intellectual grasp of the average Joe, but is ideal for musicians wanting to hear cutting edge fusion arrangements and precision instrumentation with an emphasis on JPM’s incredible bass chops. Influences from Miles Davis, Herbie Hancock and Weather Report are felt as well as elements of hip-hop and sampling. There is even a concept feel that gives a new spin on this particular flavor of acid-jazz fusion.

For more information on Joseph Patrick Moore’s Drum & Bass Society, check out his website:

 

 
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