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The Daily Cougar – April 2004 April 7, 2004

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

 

by Matt Shepherd 
The Daily Cougar

Joseph Patrick Moore’s Drum & Bass Society’s Volume 1 is every bassist’s dream — Inviting all your eclectic musician friends over to cook up some funky, ethnic musical cuisine.  JPMDBS uses more ingredients than putt-thai korat in its latest release on Blue Canoe Records. Talented and diverse musicians that are free to explore various themes in a loosely structured environment almost always yield interesting results.

From a marketing perspective, the downside to approaching a record this way is that the further one is removed from its actual performance, the less interesting the music becomes — a phenomenon that’s only amplified if the listener isn’t a musician. The onion-like layering of JPMDBS creates subtle nuances often detectable only to the musicians actually involved in the project, so don’t expect this album to break into the Top 40.

Interesting choices of material abound in Volume 1, beginning with the opening track, a cover of Men at Work’s “Down Under.” The rendition features the flute of David Freeman, the equally airy vocals of Temple Passmore and the calypso rhythms of drummer Ben Taylor and percussionists Count M’Butu and Larry Blewitt. The groove is light and breezy, but the chorus drops with the reggae earthiness of Tim Ussery’s mandolin chucking.

Original composition “Groove Messenger” is a salsa-flavored nod to Miles Davis’s Kind of Blue sessions. The samba beats provide a solid foundation for Freeman, and Vance Thompson’s modal horn jaunts into jazz age Harlem. Interesting programming and keyboard loops add a sophisticated electronic element that keeps it fresh.

The highlight of this record is the middle-eastern jam, “Cheesefrog Funk.” The frantic intro builds tension with a saxophone and a mandolin’s short bursts overlaid on the inevitable plodding of Moore himself on bass. Ziya Devletsah’s violin screams as if the electrified aeolian grains of a dust storm are bowing the strings. The violin and horns engage in a moaning dialogue over the top of an arid pocket set down by Emrah Kotan’s repetitive trash cymbals and syncopated beats along with Moore’s slap bass.

Moore showcases his bass skills on “Herbie,” a tribute to jazz/funk pioneer Herbie Hancock. He stays true to Trey Anastasio‘s playful bounce on Phish’sHeavy Things,” which is the record’s best example of the drum ‘n’ bass with its half-time bass lines and fast jungle beats.

The talent of the musicians and their unique vision is refreshing, and the resulting music is multi-layered and wildly diverse. Volume 1 imports global elements into the realm of jazz and synthetically tweaks the mixture with electronic programming. This may please those who command a more sophisticated palette and bore those who prefer lolli-pop music.

The Verdict: Put on your headphones and pick it apart like an artichoke.

Direct Link:
http://files.thedailycougar.com/static/vol69/123/arts/arts3.html

 

Creative Loafing – April 2004 April 5, 2004

Creative Loafing April 2004

Creative Loafing-vibes-sit and spin
Charlotte, NC March 2004
Review by Samir Shukla

Creative Loafing Site (Charlotte, NC)

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

 

Joseph Patrick Moore has served as a member of Col. Bruce Hampton’s Fiji Mariners and Blueground Undergrass. The bassist and multi-insrumentalist, currently based in Atlanta, produces solo records and also appears on a numerous projects as a sideman. Moore has a knack for bringing disparate musicians together into a collective that somehow manages to click. In VOLUME 1, the guest coax Moore’s seven original compositions into uptempo pop, contemporary jazz, and world fusion. There is also exotica in RAINDANCE, funk with CHEESEFROG FUNK, and groove-rock hints in HEAVY THINGS.  Sure, there are tracks that would be home in a lounge somewhere, lurkin in obscurity, but most of the record works quite well. The engaging takes on several covers include The Fixx’s ONE THING LEADS TO ANOTHER, where George and Caroline Pond from Snake Oil Medicine Show add their own obtuse dimension. The Specials GHOST TOW gets a jazzy treatment and covers of Phish, Men at Work and Tony Williams also get refurbished. Moore’s bass lines are supple, funky and don’t overwhelm the rest of the crew playing slide guitars, violin, horns, woodwinds and mandolin. His bass expecially shines in a dedication to Herbie Hancock simply entitled HERBIE.

Track to burn: GHOST TOWN
Grade: B

 

Indie-Music.com – April 2004 April 3, 2004

Artist: Joseph Patrick Moore

CD: Drum & Bass Society Volume 1

Style: Jazz/World/Pop

Quote: “Moore is a creative, mellow, almost trippy songwriter, weaving mysterious sounds and pure funk into this traditionally sophisticated genre.”

By Jennifer Layton

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

I’ve actually learned to enjoy the artsy, avant-garde feel of a group of jazz musicians getting together and letting the music flow, which is the vibe of this CD. I saw myself in a large art studio with paint-splattered hardwood floors and sheet music scattered on tables. The musicians just came in and started playing together, opening the windows to let the night air mix with the strings, woodwinds, and percussion. 

Although Moore and Crew work in several covers, most of these songs are originals. Moore is a creative, mellow, almost trippy songwriter, weaving mysterious sounds and pure funk into this traditionally sophisticated genre. I enjoyed wandering around the swirling, incense-scented, groove-heavy funk of “Jamband Express” and the tribal, rhythmic echo of “Rain Dance.” Mental barriers melt. Time dissolves. I like hanging out with these artists and just listening to them celebrate sound.

The only problem I have is when they start doing covers. I liked two of the originals too much to see their rough edges softened into jazz/world music. Moore has turned Men At Work’s “Down Under” into a woodsy, new age, flowy sound, which doesn’t seem to match lyrics about odd characters and drunken barfing. And The Fixx’s original version of “One Thing Leads To Another” had a perfectly jagged guitar riff that matched Cy Curnin’s sharp, aggressive vocal. These two songs do not lend themselves to jazz.

Having said that, I just noticed in the liner notes that one of the musicians on the “Down Under” remake is playing a pizza box with brushes. I think Colin Hay would get a kick out of that. 

 

 
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