Joseph Patrick Moore's

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Daily Tribune News – Interviews JPM May 11, 2010

Cartersville, GA: 5/11/2010: – The Daily Tribune has a nice feature interview about Joseph and Blue Canoe Records. Read the archived interview here by clicking this link.

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Christmas Time Is Here November 25, 2008

 

Dan Baraszu and Joseph Patrick Moore - Christmas Time Is Here

Dan Baraszu & Joseph Patrick Moore

In August of this year, guitarist Dan Baraszu and I went in the studio for two days to record a live jazz duet Christmas CD. Today it has been released on Blue Canoe Records. It was honor to be able to record in an intimate setting with one of my favorite guitarist’s who happens to be a dear friend.

At first I thought this would be an easy recording project, but the more I started working out the arrangement’s in pre-production, I knew it would be quite an undertaking. Recording in a duo setting (avoiding an over-produced CD) was a very eye opening experience.  The stillness and nuance required in capturing a clean performance was ever more present. Every breath, string buzz, room noise, movement was amplified once we started adding compression and effects. In a sense, this was a very naked and bare recording with no other instruments to mask the inconsistencies of our performances (particularly drums). Capturing a great performance, minus all the ambient noises was probably the biggest hurdle we had to overcome.

Secondly, how many times have we heard the vast catalog of Christmas music from multiple artists over the years? Trying to re-arrange these “standard” tunes was in and of itself a challenge. The goal of course was to try and come up with something new or create a fresh unique approach to these classic songs. All in all, recording in this duo environment with Dan was a blast. I hope each of you will enjoy the CD as much as Dan and I had in performing/recording it.

If you would like to see a video promo of us in the studio, click here

If you would like to listen, download a free song or buy the full CDclick here


Until next post, have a blessed Thanksgiving…Peace…

JPM

 

BlueCanoeRecords.com – Christmas Interview – with Dan Baraszu and JPM November 24, 2008

Filed under: * Interviews — Frank Willis c/o Blue Canoe Digital @ 8:39 pm
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BlueCanoeRecords.com

BCR Interview of JPM and Dan Baraszu – Christmas Time Is Here

 


 

BlueCanoeRecords.com 2007 Interview February 1, 2007

Filed under: * Interviews — Frank Willis c/o Blue Canoe Digital @ 8:09 pm
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Serving Jazz In The Digital Age

Feature/Interview/JPM – 2007 – Click Here

 

AllAboutJazz.com – August 2004 August 1, 2004

AllAboutJazz.com – August 2004
Review by: Mark Sabbatini

 

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

 

When an album opens with a quirky reinterpretation of the 1980s hit “Down Under” it’s safe to assume the artist is looking to have a good time. Joseph Patrick Moore succeeds to a degree in bringing listeners along on Drum And Bass Society, Vol. 1, even if the cast of players doesn’t quite let its collective hair down enough to make this a consistent fun fest throughout. It’s an all-over-the-map jam band romp where nobody’s the life of the party, but almost everyone has something interesting to say if you focus on them amidst the din.

 

The fifteen tracks include seven originals by the bass player, plus reinterpretations of hits by groups such as Phish, The Specials, and The Fixx. It’s a radical departure from Moore’s 2002 multi-tracked solo album Alone Together, with the new release featuring more than twenty musicians and only a couple of songs where Moore solos—his arranging of this huge cast is the main contribution.

 

The most unfortunate moment is Moore’s slow reggae treatment of “Down Under,” which might have been a readily identifiable crowd-pleaser, but instead comes across as unimaginative and badly at odds with the album’s overall beat. The vocals are played straight and the instrumentalists avoid anything notable for a radio-safe four minutes. The concept works much better on “One Thing Leads To Another” as one of the wind players takes over immediately on flute and doesn’t let go throughout a peppery string of phrases. It’s hardly the inspired madness of the Bad Plus, but is a plus rather than a minus to the album.

 

Speaking of inspired madness, some of the better moments of it occur on the hybrid world/funk/whatever collage of “Cheesefrog Funk.” “Groove Messenger” delivers a decent bit of fusion in the style of Miles Davis, who Moore cites as one of his big influences. And the scope of variety can be seen on the rather flute-heavy New Agey “Rain Dance” and the almost mainstream jazz of “Herbie,” a tribute to pianist Herbie Hancock.

 

The CD, released on Moore’s Blue Canoe Records, has a $9 list price, and two songs, “Jamband Express” and “Groove Messenger (The Story of Jazztronica),” are available as free MP3 downloads from Moore’s web site and online vendors such as Amazon.com .

 

Moore has proven a solid player in a variety of settings since appearing on the recording scene in the mid 1990s, and this album ranks well among his releases. Fans wanting to hear him in this setting will likely be satisfied and new listeners of such music will find it worthwhile to at least investigate the free previews. Those wanting to hear his playing will find Alone Together a better and also intriguing bet, since the overdubbing includes unexpected sounds such as percussion generated by tapping on his bass.

 

The Daily Cougar – April 2004 April 7, 2004

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

 

by Matt Shepherd 
The Daily Cougar

Joseph Patrick Moore’s Drum & Bass Society’s Volume 1 is every bassist’s dream — Inviting all your eclectic musician friends over to cook up some funky, ethnic musical cuisine.  JPMDBS uses more ingredients than putt-thai korat in its latest release on Blue Canoe Records. Talented and diverse musicians that are free to explore various themes in a loosely structured environment almost always yield interesting results.

From a marketing perspective, the downside to approaching a record this way is that the further one is removed from its actual performance, the less interesting the music becomes — a phenomenon that’s only amplified if the listener isn’t a musician. The onion-like layering of JPMDBS creates subtle nuances often detectable only to the musicians actually involved in the project, so don’t expect this album to break into the Top 40.

Interesting choices of material abound in Volume 1, beginning with the opening track, a cover of Men at Work’s “Down Under.” The rendition features the flute of David Freeman, the equally airy vocals of Temple Passmore and the calypso rhythms of drummer Ben Taylor and percussionists Count M’Butu and Larry Blewitt. The groove is light and breezy, but the chorus drops with the reggae earthiness of Tim Ussery’s mandolin chucking.

Original composition “Groove Messenger” is a salsa-flavored nod to Miles Davis’s Kind of Blue sessions. The samba beats provide a solid foundation for Freeman, and Vance Thompson’s modal horn jaunts into jazz age Harlem. Interesting programming and keyboard loops add a sophisticated electronic element that keeps it fresh.

The highlight of this record is the middle-eastern jam, “Cheesefrog Funk.” The frantic intro builds tension with a saxophone and a mandolin’s short bursts overlaid on the inevitable plodding of Moore himself on bass. Ziya Devletsah’s violin screams as if the electrified aeolian grains of a dust storm are bowing the strings. The violin and horns engage in a moaning dialogue over the top of an arid pocket set down by Emrah Kotan’s repetitive trash cymbals and syncopated beats along with Moore’s slap bass.

Moore showcases his bass skills on “Herbie,” a tribute to jazz/funk pioneer Herbie Hancock. He stays true to Trey Anastasio‘s playful bounce on Phish’sHeavy Things,” which is the record’s best example of the drum ‘n’ bass with its half-time bass lines and fast jungle beats.

The talent of the musicians and their unique vision is refreshing, and the resulting music is multi-layered and wildly diverse. Volume 1 imports global elements into the realm of jazz and synthetically tweaks the mixture with electronic programming. This may please those who command a more sophisticated palette and bore those who prefer lolli-pop music.

The Verdict: Put on your headphones and pick it apart like an artichoke.

Direct Link:
http://files.thedailycougar.com/static/vol69/123/arts/arts3.html

 

 
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