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JazzReview.com – August 2002 August 1, 2002

JazzReview.com – August 2002

Featured Artist: Joseph Patrick Moore

CD Title: Alone Together 

Year: 2002
Record Label: Root Cellar Record
Style: Free Jazz / Avante Garde
Review By: Wendy E. Ross

Alone Together

Alone Together

Review: Joseph Patrick Moore’s third solo CD, Alone Together, is an intriguing mixture of Jazz, Funk, Classical and Soul. It draws you in slowly, enchanting you with varieties of mood and space. Moore creates and populates whole landscapes with impressionistic sound. He is probably best known for his stints as a member of BlueGround UnderGrass and Col. Bruce Hampton and the Fiji Mariners.

 

The title cut convincingly holds it’s anchor spot, despite being the next to the last cut on the CD. Alone Together is vibratingly slow and beautiful. It’s as if Moore were blindly brailling, his bass. Moore claims this cut as his interpretation of the Dietz/Schwartz jazz standard. The thought of being ‘alone together’ with his instrument served as the inspiration for this title and for the whole album. The cut begins with western flavor, the music heavy with foreboding. It’s like the main street of a deserted gold rush town, after the mine has shutdown. In the distance storm clouds gather and the few residents left, hide indoors as if expecting the storm to blow in an outlaw along with the rain. The notes fall like leftover raindrops down a windowpane or like a single tear, sliding down a hot dusty cheek.

Cuts one and four,Waterfall and Fall, balance each other in equal and opposing measure. Waterfall has a classical, almost baroque sound, ponderous, but at the same time soaring with lighter pizzicato notes. Moore’s liner quotes speak of a waterfall being forceful yet mysterious, and that if you look closely, you can see a rainbow through the mist. Fall according to Moore, is about his favorite season of morphing color, rededication, and renewal. The bass holds full- throated, falling notes, evoking the warm, rich colors with a lush, multi-layered sound. He draws the notes out as if wanting to linger over them and not let them go.

On the cuts, Landscape, Prayer of Solitude, Masoko Tanga the bass has an Asian sound; one can almost hear a Koto and sometimes even a gong. The beginning of Landscape is other- worldly, bringing to mind a lunar terrain. Moore’s inspiration for the song was a desolate swamp, but in the distance he could see the most glorious sunset.

Cut five and six, Sooner Or Later and Bobby McFerrin’s Drive are fun and funky. There’s a heavy beat, but also a whimsical humor. It’s a journey with various adventures along the way passing pastures with cows, one minute and ending up in a biker pub the next.

Qui- Es Tu Marie- Jeanne is a gorgeous sonorous tune, with classical leanings. The pensive searching chorus evokes the impression of nymphet in chiffon floral dress running barefoot through the winter bare gardens of a historic mansion searching for what was once there, but is now gone’

Significant musicians and events inspired several cuts on the CD. Bebop Charlie, a bold rooster strut of a tune is dedicated to Charlie ‘Yardbird’ Parker, and reminiscent of his style, Pause # 4, dedicated to Ron Carter, Dave Holland, Victor Wooten, and Bill Frisell gallops, with enough ‘airs above the ground’ to make a Lippizaner Stallion look like Pegasus. The track Numb, was a reaction to September 11th. The opening crashes in like the dissonant buzz of a TV channel with bad reception. White noise? It certainly is numbing.

The final cut Offering– speaks of the unique gift each person has to give the world. New age dissonant, with whispered ghost like poet-speak vocals, it’s hauntingly repetitive and querulous.

 

I’d definitely recommend Moore’s latest CD. This is not background music but an adventure that leads one on a journey of introspection. It’s disturbing, in that instead of sending you to sleep, it would be more likely to stir your creative juices. Take a listen and see if you have the courage to be ‘Alone Together’

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All Music Guide – June 3, 2002 June 3, 2002

AllMusicGuide.com 

By Matt Collar

 

Alone Together

Alone Together

 

 

Bassists and bass fanatics should find much to salivate over on Joseph Patrick Moore’s all-bass solo CD, Alone Together. Moore performs all the basses here, more often than not multi-tracking himself with various accompaniment on different basses; he is technically proficient on both acoustic double bass and the myriad electric kinds. Interestingly, Moore even creates rhythm tracks with the various clicks and taps he generates from the bass strings, as is evident on his cover of The Police’s “Masoko Tanga.”  The music is resolutely jazz-based, but also features funk, rock, classical, world, modern atonal, and soul styles. Many of the songs lean toward the avant-garde and feature fuzzy soundscapes and impressionist textures, even when Moore attacks a standard such as the album’s namesake. Despite the impressive technical and creative abilities Moore showcases here, there is an insular quality to the recording, almost as if he made the album as a personal experiment he could control completely with no outside input. This makes for a beautiful if somewhat preconceived and clinical listen. Nonetheless, a project this ambitious and unique is worth checking out.

 

Bassically.net – May 2002 May 24, 2002

Bassically.net May 2002
Review by Cliff Engel
Bassically.net

 

Alone Together

Alone Together

 

Drawing from a deep pool of jazz, funk, classical, and soul influences, Joseph Patrick Moore has delievered his third outing as a solo act with Alone Together. Moore’s latest project is comprised of eleven original compositions and four skillfully arranged covers from artists such as Bobby McFerrin and The Police.  As an electric/acoustic doubler, Moore has successfully combined the best of both bass worlds while utilizing only the sounds of electric fretted, fretless, and acoustic upright basses.  This effort finds Moore in solo, duo, and trio settings with perfectly orchestrated, multi-layered bass loops using both electric and acoustic basses can work together within the structure of a single piece of music in a completely coherent fashion. I can’t recall ever hearing this form of instrumentation being documented so well and convincingly. From tapping, slapping, harmonic, and chordal techniques on his electric basses to bowed, pizzicato, and walking chops on his upright bass, Moore proves he is more than totally proficient in each area. However, don’t let all of his dazzling technical displays distract you from the music and emotional content he is able to create as a result of his chops.

Bottom Line: With his previous two solo projects, Joseph Patrick Moore set the standard and firmly established himself as one of today’s up-and-coming premier bass artists. Now, with his dominating command of both acoustic and electric instruments on Alone Together, Moore has raised the bar yet again and demonstrated that he is one of the brightest electric/acoustic doublers on the scene today.

 

 
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