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CD release and personal notes – written by JPM May 11, 2010

To Africa With Love

Hello friends,

Today (May 11th, 2010) my newest CD “To Africa With Love” is released on Blue Canoe Records. I’m so excited to share this recording with you and hope that you will check it out and enjoy!

As the title suggests, “To Africa With Love” is a collection of songs inspired by the magical enchantment of Africa, fused with my musical influences and American heritage.  These audio vibrations are a snapshot of my life from June 2008 through the completion of this recording on February 11th, 2010.  Through happiness and pain, this recording captures my daily journey of the many facets in the creative process.  The composition, arrangement, performance, engineering, mix and overall production of this audio diary reflects my present musical and spiritual state.

Music has no boundaries and can not be separated by oceans, governments and principalities.  Music has the power to uplift, connect, heal and create universal harmony for the human race.  As God’s vessel, each of us are on a spiritual journey to develop and embrace the gifts He has given to us. With these gifts we should be reminded to develop and share them for and with our fellow man. Each of our unique thumbprints should not be taken for granted but must be utilized for the greater good.  It is my sincere hope that this CD captures and embraces this spirit, as it is the nucleus of every note and creative thought I relay to you.

This CD would not have been possible without the following artist’s who added their unique thumbprint to this recording:
Tyrone Jackson (keys)
Brian Carl (guitar)
Wayne Viar (drums/percussion)
Charlie Wood (vocals)
Seth Condrey (vocals, acoustic guitar)
Chinua Hawk (vocals)
Abbes Bouzefrane (vocals)
Ken Love (mastering)

To Listen, Hear, Watch, Buy visit – JPMAfricaLove.com

Sincerely,
Joseph Patrick Moore

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AllAboutJazz.com – August 2004 August 1, 2004

AllAboutJazz.com – August 2004
Review by: Mark Sabbatini

 

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

 

When an album opens with a quirky reinterpretation of the 1980s hit “Down Under” it’s safe to assume the artist is looking to have a good time. Joseph Patrick Moore succeeds to a degree in bringing listeners along on Drum And Bass Society, Vol. 1, even if the cast of players doesn’t quite let its collective hair down enough to make this a consistent fun fest throughout. It’s an all-over-the-map jam band romp where nobody’s the life of the party, but almost everyone has something interesting to say if you focus on them amidst the din.

 

The fifteen tracks include seven originals by the bass player, plus reinterpretations of hits by groups such as Phish, The Specials, and The Fixx. It’s a radical departure from Moore’s 2002 multi-tracked solo album Alone Together, with the new release featuring more than twenty musicians and only a couple of songs where Moore solos—his arranging of this huge cast is the main contribution.

 

The most unfortunate moment is Moore’s slow reggae treatment of “Down Under,” which might have been a readily identifiable crowd-pleaser, but instead comes across as unimaginative and badly at odds with the album’s overall beat. The vocals are played straight and the instrumentalists avoid anything notable for a radio-safe four minutes. The concept works much better on “One Thing Leads To Another” as one of the wind players takes over immediately on flute and doesn’t let go throughout a peppery string of phrases. It’s hardly the inspired madness of the Bad Plus, but is a plus rather than a minus to the album.

 

Speaking of inspired madness, some of the better moments of it occur on the hybrid world/funk/whatever collage of “Cheesefrog Funk.” “Groove Messenger” delivers a decent bit of fusion in the style of Miles Davis, who Moore cites as one of his big influences. And the scope of variety can be seen on the rather flute-heavy New Agey “Rain Dance” and the almost mainstream jazz of “Herbie,” a tribute to pianist Herbie Hancock.

 

The CD, released on Moore’s Blue Canoe Records, has a $9 list price, and two songs, “Jamband Express” and “Groove Messenger (The Story of Jazztronica),” are available as free MP3 downloads from Moore’s web site and online vendors such as Amazon.com .

 

Moore has proven a solid player in a variety of settings since appearing on the recording scene in the mid 1990s, and this album ranks well among his releases. Fans wanting to hear him in this setting will likely be satisfied and new listeners of such music will find it worthwhile to at least investigate the free previews. Those wanting to hear his playing will find Alone Together a better and also intriguing bet, since the overdubbing includes unexpected sounds such as percussion generated by tapping on his bass.

 

Talkbass – November 2000 November 13, 2000

Talkbass, November 2000
Review by June Rhee
www.talkbass.com

Soul Cloud

Soul Cloud

The first image that came to mind when I listened to SoulCloud, which features bassist Joseph Patrick Moore’s original compositions, was a swank nightclub patroned by hipsters cloaked in black leather at some unidentified New York venue. Tipping its hat to 1970s funk, this CD contains talented musicians and tight ensemble work, both of which are further strengthened by a quality recording. Solo highlights include trumpeter Vance Thompson on track 4, pianist Bill Anschell on track 2, and drummer Phillip Smith on track 5, not to mention Moore’s own bass prowess, which he shows off on an intense bass solo that evokes memoirs of Seinfeldesque city streets entitled BIG BUTT BASS. The name yells it all.

This is a strong CD, much to Moore’s credit. However, while swank isn’t necessarily a bad image, nearly 9 tracks of it does lend itself to leaving the listener rather musically parched. The instrumentation on 6 of the 9 tracks – bass, guitar, brass, drums, keyboards has little variation, and the structure of the pieces felt rather convoluted at times until the solos kicked in. The ensemble in general lacked a certain spark, incited when the members click perfectly together on a personal and musical level.  Rather, I heard several talented musicians playing different instruments at the same time. Perhaps on the next CD Moore can experiment with his setup through utilizing a smaller group of musicians or varying the instrumentation on more tracks.

Moore’s arrangement of GOING TO CALIFORNIA was beautiful, providing a welcome respite from the dark, underground atmosphere of the earlier tracks. Most worthy of note was his jazzed-up arrangement of DUST IN THE WIND, to be avoided by any of you Kansas purists out there. I, on the other hand, highly enjoyed the brisk, sunny-side-up mood.

These shortcomings did little to detract from my coffee and Nutella morning ritual, however. I indeed look forward to and hope to hear more of this bassist’s creations.

 

 
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