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Aguilar Interview – Joseph Patrick Moore August 27, 2010

Date: 8-26-2010
Post: Frank Willis
Re: Joseph Patrick Moore Interviewed by Aguilar Amplification.

Recently Aguilar Amplification sat down with an exclusive interview with Joseph Patrick Moore. JPM discusses his Aguilar bass rig, playing at Crossroads Guitar Festival 2010, Earl Klugh, Col. Bruce Hampton, Stewart Copeland (The Police) and his latest CD release To Africa With Love.

READ THE INTERVIEW BY CLICKING HERE

Joseph Patrick Moore Aguilar Bass Rig

Joseph Patrick Moore's Aguilar Bass Rig

 

An Honest Tune – August 2002 August 13, 2002

An Honest Tune August 2002
August 2002
Vol. 4, number 1
Review by Tom Speed

An Honest Tune Website

Alone Together

Alone Together

Though best known for his turns as the bass player for Fiji Mariners and BlueGround UnderGrass, Joseph Patrick Moore presents here on his third solo release nothing but his bass-fifteen tracks that touch on jazz, rock, and classical music. Most of the tracks were written by Moore but he also includes some interesting cover selections such as the Police’s MASOKO TANGA. Alone Together features Moore on upright acoustic and electric basses with overdubs and samples and whatever else it takes to make it work. Listening to this record, one gets the feeling of being invited into Moore’s living room for a long musical conversation that lasts well into the night.

It’s a must for bass players but is also an excellent record that captures an amazing performer and his craft.

 

JazzReview.com – August 2002 August 1, 2002

JazzReview.com – August 2002

Featured Artist: Joseph Patrick Moore

CD Title: Alone Together 

Year: 2002
Record Label: Root Cellar Record
Style: Free Jazz / Avante Garde
Review By: Wendy E. Ross

Alone Together

Alone Together

Review: Joseph Patrick Moore’s third solo CD, Alone Together, is an intriguing mixture of Jazz, Funk, Classical and Soul. It draws you in slowly, enchanting you with varieties of mood and space. Moore creates and populates whole landscapes with impressionistic sound. He is probably best known for his stints as a member of BlueGround UnderGrass and Col. Bruce Hampton and the Fiji Mariners.

 

The title cut convincingly holds it’s anchor spot, despite being the next to the last cut on the CD. Alone Together is vibratingly slow and beautiful. It’s as if Moore were blindly brailling, his bass. Moore claims this cut as his interpretation of the Dietz/Schwartz jazz standard. The thought of being ‘alone together’ with his instrument served as the inspiration for this title and for the whole album. The cut begins with western flavor, the music heavy with foreboding. It’s like the main street of a deserted gold rush town, after the mine has shutdown. In the distance storm clouds gather and the few residents left, hide indoors as if expecting the storm to blow in an outlaw along with the rain. The notes fall like leftover raindrops down a windowpane or like a single tear, sliding down a hot dusty cheek.

Cuts one and four,Waterfall and Fall, balance each other in equal and opposing measure. Waterfall has a classical, almost baroque sound, ponderous, but at the same time soaring with lighter pizzicato notes. Moore’s liner quotes speak of a waterfall being forceful yet mysterious, and that if you look closely, you can see a rainbow through the mist. Fall according to Moore, is about his favorite season of morphing color, rededication, and renewal. The bass holds full- throated, falling notes, evoking the warm, rich colors with a lush, multi-layered sound. He draws the notes out as if wanting to linger over them and not let them go.

On the cuts, Landscape, Prayer of Solitude, Masoko Tanga the bass has an Asian sound; one can almost hear a Koto and sometimes even a gong. The beginning of Landscape is other- worldly, bringing to mind a lunar terrain. Moore’s inspiration for the song was a desolate swamp, but in the distance he could see the most glorious sunset.

Cut five and six, Sooner Or Later and Bobby McFerrin’s Drive are fun and funky. There’s a heavy beat, but also a whimsical humor. It’s a journey with various adventures along the way passing pastures with cows, one minute and ending up in a biker pub the next.

Qui- Es Tu Marie- Jeanne is a gorgeous sonorous tune, with classical leanings. The pensive searching chorus evokes the impression of nymphet in chiffon floral dress running barefoot through the winter bare gardens of a historic mansion searching for what was once there, but is now gone’

Significant musicians and events inspired several cuts on the CD. Bebop Charlie, a bold rooster strut of a tune is dedicated to Charlie ‘Yardbird’ Parker, and reminiscent of his style, Pause # 4, dedicated to Ron Carter, Dave Holland, Victor Wooten, and Bill Frisell gallops, with enough ‘airs above the ground’ to make a Lippizaner Stallion look like Pegasus. The track Numb, was a reaction to September 11th. The opening crashes in like the dissonant buzz of a TV channel with bad reception. White noise? It certainly is numbing.

The final cut Offering– speaks of the unique gift each person has to give the world. New age dissonant, with whispered ghost like poet-speak vocals, it’s hauntingly repetitive and querulous.

 

I’d definitely recommend Moore’s latest CD. This is not background music but an adventure that leads one on a journey of introspection. It’s disturbing, in that instead of sending you to sleep, it would be more likely to stir your creative juices. Take a listen and see if you have the courage to be ‘Alone Together’

 

Homegrown Music – May 2002 May 21, 2002

Homegrown Music May 2002
Dancing Tree Newsletter May 21, 2002
Review by Bryan Rodgers

Alone Together

Alone Together

Joseph Patrick MooreAlone Together CD– Outstanding solo work from this master of the low end!  This is truly a solo bass CD, with Moore using only bass to create his visions. Loops, solos, and complex compositions dot this enhanced CD, which features a video of Moore performing DRIVE, and much more. Moore is best know for hist stints with BlueGround UnderGrass
and Fiji Mariners.

Your jaw will be on the floor….this guy simply tears it up!

 

An Honest Tune – June 2001 June 21, 2001

An Honest Tune, June/2001
Review by Bryan Irby

Soul Cloud

Soul Cloud

New BlueGround UnderGrass bassist Joseph Moore (ex-Fiji Mariners/Planet Zambee) has just released a second solo album on his own independent label MMP. SOUL CLOUD continues in the same contemporary jazz vein as his 1996 release NEVER NEVER LAND. While much of this material is a bit too smooth for my jazz tastes there are some definite funky highlights like ASHES TO ASHES, MUMPHIS COSANOSTRA, and DATZ IT, all 3 which feature Yonrico Scott (Derek Trucks Band) on drums and Jimmy Herring on guitar. The simpler, bass-centric tunes on the album are also among the best tracks. Pause#3 is a bass, sitar & drum free-jazz piece dedicated to Miles Davis Drummer Tony Williams (Pause 1 and 2 on NEVER NEVER LAND were dedicated to Miles Davis and Jaco Pastorius). BIG BUTT BASS is exactly that: in-yer-face solo slap bass, and there’s a nice bass & saxophone take on Led Zepplin’s GOING TO CALIFORNIA. These tunes and the hidden track ANOTHER DAY ANOTHER TIME ( a beautiful rainy-day-in-Memphis piece) outshine the title track and a cover of DUST IN THE WIND which I find unlistenable.

Catch Joseph Patrick Moore on tour with BlueGround UnderGrass or his own group.

 

Inside Savannah – November 2000 November 1, 2000

Inside Savannah , November 2000
Review by Jeff McDermott

Soul Cloud

Soul Cloud

 

What does a bassist do when he’s leading the session? Stay in the rhythm section and you’re too subdued. Work the front of the arrangement and you’re showboating. Moore, a former member of Col. Bruce Hampton’s groups the Fiji Mariners and Planet Zambee tries to ride the fence on his second solo CD. It’s mostly a mainstream jazz effort, showing some tasteful interplay with bass and brass on cuts like DATZ IT. Things dangerously approach fusion when guests like guitarist Jimmy Herring does the yank-me-crank-me on ASHES TO ASHES (not the Bowie song). Fans of Joseph’s long-strange-trip workouts with the Col. might find this a nice CD to play during dinner.

 

Bassically.net – October 2000 October 3, 2000

Bassically.net, October 2000
Review by Cliff Engel

Soul Cloud

Soul Cloud

Joseph Patrick Moore, former Col. Bruce Hampton bassist, released SOULCLOUD, his second solo instrumental jazz cd on October 10, 2000. Soulcloud is the follow-up effort to Moore’s 1996 independently released debut, NEVER NEVER LAND. As a freelance bassist, Moore has displayed the diversity of his musical talents in a wide array of musical genres including various form of jazz, rock, and blues music to name just a few. On SoulCloud Moore continues to demonstrate his versatility in a number of group settings including solo, duo, trio, and full blown ensemble settings. Moore, a multi-instrumentalist, switches seemingly effortlessly between fretted and fretless electric and upright basses.

Right from its onset you’ll notice that SoulCloud is an extremely well produced offering featuring Moore’s bass talents well in front of the mix (the way recordings ought to be). On a number of the tunes I detected the funky vibes of the Col. Bruce Hampton sound which I’m certain Moore picked up during the time he spent as a member of Hampton’s own Fiji Mariners and Planet Zambee ensembles. For those of you not familiar with the Col., it was he that helped launch the career of the now renowned bass artist, Oteil Burbridge. Also those of you well-versed with the Hampton library should immediately recognize the sounds of another Hampton sideman, guitarist Jimmy Herring, who appears as one of the many featured guest performers on SoulCloud.

Moore opens SoulCloud with a tight horn arrangement on DATZ IT (my favorite piece) and reveals his impeccable technique on acoustic and electric basses. Moore then presents us with the first of five original compositions with the fretless sounds of ASHES TO ASHES. Besides the phat funk grooves which Moore proves he can undoubtedly handle with ease, Moore takes center stage for a brief moment to exhibit his tasty solo slap chops on BIG BUTT BASS (very impressive indeed) before neatly sequeing into the album’s title track. Moore shifts to a trio format of electric bass, drums and sitar on PAUSE #3, an interesting piece dedicated to the late great Tony Williams.  Next Moore offers you the listener the funky sounds of the very hip MUMPHIS COSANOSTRA. Then Moore continues to expand upon his deep-in-the-pocket bassmanship within the soulful sounds of COSMIC DANCE, another Moore original composition. Finally, Moore rounds out SoulCloud with two cover tunes, Led Zeppelin’s GOING TO CALIFORNIA is a brilliant duo arrrangement featuring the unlikely combination of electric bass and soprano saxophone. However, this is primarily a solo bass arrangement consisting of arpeggiated melodic, harmonic, and chordal content. I like how Moore tints the color of this piece with the short sax section that gracefully weaves in and out of the bass content. Moore then presents the listener with a jazzed up version of DUST IN THE WIND that highlights Moore’s upright skills during the outro solo. For those of you that discover the disc’s hidden track, you’ll hear the eerie harmonic-laden sound of ANOTHER DAY ANOTHER TIME. A solo bass piece recorded on a rainy afternoon in Memphis, Tennessee back in 1994.

Bottom Line: If you have never heard the talent of Joseph Patrick Moore, it is just a matter of time before you will.

 

 
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