Joseph Patrick Moore's

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Bass Guitar Magazine (UK) – 2004 November 21, 2004

BassGuitar Magazine (UK) November 2004
Review by Andy Long
for ThirdBass. Commisioned by Bass Guitar Magazine.

Bass Guitar Magazine Site
Bass Guitar Magazine Issue 14 

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

A surprisingly mellow version of Men At Work’sDown Under‘ opens this latest project from Atlanta based session man Moore. It’s an colourful album that takes a tour around some of his influences, for instance the opening track is followed by a jazz arrangement of ‘Ghost Town’ by The Specials and the songs of Tony Williams, Phish and The Fixx are also to be found. His own compositions are a cocktail of funk, jazz and soul shaken and stirred by a multitude of musicians. ‘Jamband Express‘ has a solid blues/funk feel with an irresistible groove and his tribute to Herbie Hancock, ‘Herbie‘ is a showcase for some outstanding soloing, Adam Nitti pops up on this track as an added bonus. Moore was recently named as one of the 100 greatest jazz bassist by Digital Dream Door and this album is the lastest testament to that achievement.

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Relix – October 2002 October 20, 2002

Relix – October 2002
October/November
Vol. 29. Number 5
Review by Art Howard
Relix.com

Alone Together

Alone Together

Prior to the era of grunge it was popular for musicians to possess musicianship. The jamband scene has come to the rescue for those of us who still prefer players who know how to play, and one of the better bass players in the jamband world is former BlueGround UnderGrass bassist Joseph Patrick Moore.  His new solo LP, ALONE TOGETHER, consists of only one instrument, the bass (electric and stand-up), multi-tracked and played in a variety of octaves to create a bass symphony. On the stylistic side, what sets Moore apart from most bass virtuosos is that he actually plays bass parts on the bass rather than guitar parts. Further distancing him from the instrumentalist flock is that ALONE TOGETHER demonstrates he is facile and versatile without
turning into a circus sideshow.  The tunes are low-key and understated, and he touches on an interesting variety of styles, mainly jazz, ambient and funk.

 

JazzReview.com – August 2002 August 1, 2002

JazzReview.com – August 2002

Featured Artist: Joseph Patrick Moore

CD Title: Alone Together 

Year: 2002
Record Label: Root Cellar Record
Style: Free Jazz / Avante Garde
Review By: Wendy E. Ross

Alone Together

Alone Together

Review: Joseph Patrick Moore’s third solo CD, Alone Together, is an intriguing mixture of Jazz, Funk, Classical and Soul. It draws you in slowly, enchanting you with varieties of mood and space. Moore creates and populates whole landscapes with impressionistic sound. He is probably best known for his stints as a member of BlueGround UnderGrass and Col. Bruce Hampton and the Fiji Mariners.

 

The title cut convincingly holds it’s anchor spot, despite being the next to the last cut on the CD. Alone Together is vibratingly slow and beautiful. It’s as if Moore were blindly brailling, his bass. Moore claims this cut as his interpretation of the Dietz/Schwartz jazz standard. The thought of being ‘alone together’ with his instrument served as the inspiration for this title and for the whole album. The cut begins with western flavor, the music heavy with foreboding. It’s like the main street of a deserted gold rush town, after the mine has shutdown. In the distance storm clouds gather and the few residents left, hide indoors as if expecting the storm to blow in an outlaw along with the rain. The notes fall like leftover raindrops down a windowpane or like a single tear, sliding down a hot dusty cheek.

Cuts one and four,Waterfall and Fall, balance each other in equal and opposing measure. Waterfall has a classical, almost baroque sound, ponderous, but at the same time soaring with lighter pizzicato notes. Moore’s liner quotes speak of a waterfall being forceful yet mysterious, and that if you look closely, you can see a rainbow through the mist. Fall according to Moore, is about his favorite season of morphing color, rededication, and renewal. The bass holds full- throated, falling notes, evoking the warm, rich colors with a lush, multi-layered sound. He draws the notes out as if wanting to linger over them and not let them go.

On the cuts, Landscape, Prayer of Solitude, Masoko Tanga the bass has an Asian sound; one can almost hear a Koto and sometimes even a gong. The beginning of Landscape is other- worldly, bringing to mind a lunar terrain. Moore’s inspiration for the song was a desolate swamp, but in the distance he could see the most glorious sunset.

Cut five and six, Sooner Or Later and Bobby McFerrin’s Drive are fun and funky. There’s a heavy beat, but also a whimsical humor. It’s a journey with various adventures along the way passing pastures with cows, one minute and ending up in a biker pub the next.

Qui- Es Tu Marie- Jeanne is a gorgeous sonorous tune, with classical leanings. The pensive searching chorus evokes the impression of nymphet in chiffon floral dress running barefoot through the winter bare gardens of a historic mansion searching for what was once there, but is now gone’

Significant musicians and events inspired several cuts on the CD. Bebop Charlie, a bold rooster strut of a tune is dedicated to Charlie ‘Yardbird’ Parker, and reminiscent of his style, Pause # 4, dedicated to Ron Carter, Dave Holland, Victor Wooten, and Bill Frisell gallops, with enough ‘airs above the ground’ to make a Lippizaner Stallion look like Pegasus. The track Numb, was a reaction to September 11th. The opening crashes in like the dissonant buzz of a TV channel with bad reception. White noise? It certainly is numbing.

The final cut Offering– speaks of the unique gift each person has to give the world. New age dissonant, with whispered ghost like poet-speak vocals, it’s hauntingly repetitive and querulous.

 

I’d definitely recommend Moore’s latest CD. This is not background music but an adventure that leads one on a journey of introspection. It’s disturbing, in that instead of sending you to sleep, it would be more likely to stir your creative juices. Take a listen and see if you have the courage to be ‘Alone Together’

 

Nashville Music Guide – May 2002 May 25, 2002

Nashville Music Guide May 2002
7 out of 7 stars
Review by Brad Fischer
Nashville Music Guide Website

Alone Together

Alone Together

It seems I’m tripping instrumentally this month. This Root Cellar Records release of bassist Joseph Patrick Moore is a definite must for any record collection. The fifteen song CD is an eclectic mix of jazz, funk, classical and soul that is most inspirational in a musical sense. Part of the fun is figuring on which cuts is Moore playing which bass…acoustic, electric or fretless. Scheduled for release on June 18, 2002, the enhanced CD also includes a free Multimedia Musical portion which includes a special video performance of Bobby Mcferrin’s DRIVE, and many extras.

Check it out!

 

Bassically.net – May 2002 May 24, 2002

Bassically.net May 2002
Review by Cliff Engel
Bassically.net

 

Alone Together

Alone Together

 

Drawing from a deep pool of jazz, funk, classical, and soul influences, Joseph Patrick Moore has delievered his third outing as a solo act with Alone Together. Moore’s latest project is comprised of eleven original compositions and four skillfully arranged covers from artists such as Bobby McFerrin and The Police.  As an electric/acoustic doubler, Moore has successfully combined the best of both bass worlds while utilizing only the sounds of electric fretted, fretless, and acoustic upright basses.  This effort finds Moore in solo, duo, and trio settings with perfectly orchestrated, multi-layered bass loops using both electric and acoustic basses can work together within the structure of a single piece of music in a completely coherent fashion. I can’t recall ever hearing this form of instrumentation being documented so well and convincingly. From tapping, slapping, harmonic, and chordal techniques on his electric basses to bowed, pizzicato, and walking chops on his upright bass, Moore proves he is more than totally proficient in each area. However, don’t let all of his dazzling technical displays distract you from the music and emotional content he is able to create as a result of his chops.

Bottom Line: With his previous two solo projects, Joseph Patrick Moore set the standard and firmly established himself as one of today’s up-and-coming premier bass artists. Now, with his dominating command of both acoustic and electric instruments on Alone Together, Moore has raised the bar yet again and demonstrated that he is one of the brightest electric/acoustic doublers on the scene today.

 

Talkbass – November 2000 November 13, 2000

Talkbass, November 2000
Review by June Rhee
www.talkbass.com

Soul Cloud

Soul Cloud

The first image that came to mind when I listened to SoulCloud, which features bassist Joseph Patrick Moore’s original compositions, was a swank nightclub patroned by hipsters cloaked in black leather at some unidentified New York venue. Tipping its hat to 1970s funk, this CD contains talented musicians and tight ensemble work, both of which are further strengthened by a quality recording. Solo highlights include trumpeter Vance Thompson on track 4, pianist Bill Anschell on track 2, and drummer Phillip Smith on track 5, not to mention Moore’s own bass prowess, which he shows off on an intense bass solo that evokes memoirs of Seinfeldesque city streets entitled BIG BUTT BASS. The name yells it all.

This is a strong CD, much to Moore’s credit. However, while swank isn’t necessarily a bad image, nearly 9 tracks of it does lend itself to leaving the listener rather musically parched. The instrumentation on 6 of the 9 tracks – bass, guitar, brass, drums, keyboards has little variation, and the structure of the pieces felt rather convoluted at times until the solos kicked in. The ensemble in general lacked a certain spark, incited when the members click perfectly together on a personal and musical level.  Rather, I heard several talented musicians playing different instruments at the same time. Perhaps on the next CD Moore can experiment with his setup through utilizing a smaller group of musicians or varying the instrumentation on more tracks.

Moore’s arrangement of GOING TO CALIFORNIA was beautiful, providing a welcome respite from the dark, underground atmosphere of the earlier tracks. Most worthy of note was his jazzed-up arrangement of DUST IN THE WIND, to be avoided by any of you Kansas purists out there. I, on the other hand, highly enjoyed the brisk, sunny-side-up mood.

These shortcomings did little to detract from my coffee and Nutella morning ritual, however. I indeed look forward to and hope to hear more of this bassist’s creations.

 

Knoxville News Sentinel – January 19th, 1997 January 19, 1997

Knoxville News Sentinel January 19, 1997
Showtime
Review by Wayne Bledsoe
Knoxville News Sentinel

Never Never Land

Never Never Land

Former Knoxvillian Joseph Patrick Moore has taken his funky bass to the wilds of Memphis. The bassist’s new disc, NEVER NEVER LAND is a likable collection of old fashioned funk and jazz fusion. The disc also features some of the cream of the Memphis Jazz scene. Cool tunes, including INTUITION and CORNER OF THE WORLD, are easy to listen to but are an edge above much of the lite jazz on the market. Moore and the band play with thought and feeling, and every now and then toss in a hot surprise. Some of the best cuts are filled with nice brass work, and soprano saxophonist Jim Spake often stands out in the talented group.

The disc may be hard to find, but its worth searching for.

 

 
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