Joseph Patrick Moore's

Blog/Interviews/News/Reviews

Bass Guitar Magazine (UK) – 2004 November 21, 2004

BassGuitar Magazine (UK) November 2004
Review by Andy Long
for ThirdBass. Commisioned by Bass Guitar Magazine.

Bass Guitar Magazine Site
Bass Guitar Magazine Issue 14 

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

A surprisingly mellow version of Men At Work’sDown Under‘ opens this latest project from Atlanta based session man Moore. It’s an colourful album that takes a tour around some of his influences, for instance the opening track is followed by a jazz arrangement of ‘Ghost Town’ by The Specials and the songs of Tony Williams, Phish and The Fixx are also to be found. His own compositions are a cocktail of funk, jazz and soul shaken and stirred by a multitude of musicians. ‘Jamband Express‘ has a solid blues/funk feel with an irresistible groove and his tribute to Herbie Hancock, ‘Herbie‘ is a showcase for some outstanding soloing, Adam Nitti pops up on this track as an added bonus. Moore was recently named as one of the 100 greatest jazz bassist by Digital Dream Door and this album is the lastest testament to that achievement.

Advertisements
 

AllAboutJazz.com – August 2004 August 1, 2004

AllAboutJazz.com – August 2004
Review by: Mark Sabbatini

 

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

 

When an album opens with a quirky reinterpretation of the 1980s hit “Down Under” it’s safe to assume the artist is looking to have a good time. Joseph Patrick Moore succeeds to a degree in bringing listeners along on Drum And Bass Society, Vol. 1, even if the cast of players doesn’t quite let its collective hair down enough to make this a consistent fun fest throughout. It’s an all-over-the-map jam band romp where nobody’s the life of the party, but almost everyone has something interesting to say if you focus on them amidst the din.

 

The fifteen tracks include seven originals by the bass player, plus reinterpretations of hits by groups such as Phish, The Specials, and The Fixx. It’s a radical departure from Moore’s 2002 multi-tracked solo album Alone Together, with the new release featuring more than twenty musicians and only a couple of songs where Moore solos—his arranging of this huge cast is the main contribution.

 

The most unfortunate moment is Moore’s slow reggae treatment of “Down Under,” which might have been a readily identifiable crowd-pleaser, but instead comes across as unimaginative and badly at odds with the album’s overall beat. The vocals are played straight and the instrumentalists avoid anything notable for a radio-safe four minutes. The concept works much better on “One Thing Leads To Another” as one of the wind players takes over immediately on flute and doesn’t let go throughout a peppery string of phrases. It’s hardly the inspired madness of the Bad Plus, but is a plus rather than a minus to the album.

 

Speaking of inspired madness, some of the better moments of it occur on the hybrid world/funk/whatever collage of “Cheesefrog Funk.” “Groove Messenger” delivers a decent bit of fusion in the style of Miles Davis, who Moore cites as one of his big influences. And the scope of variety can be seen on the rather flute-heavy New Agey “Rain Dance” and the almost mainstream jazz of “Herbie,” a tribute to pianist Herbie Hancock.

 

The CD, released on Moore’s Blue Canoe Records, has a $9 list price, and two songs, “Jamband Express” and “Groove Messenger (The Story of Jazztronica),” are available as free MP3 downloads from Moore’s web site and online vendors such as Amazon.com .

 

Moore has proven a solid player in a variety of settings since appearing on the recording scene in the mid 1990s, and this album ranks well among his releases. Fans wanting to hear him in this setting will likely be satisfied and new listeners of such music will find it worthwhile to at least investigate the free previews. Those wanting to hear his playing will find Alone Together a better and also intriguing bet, since the overdubbing includes unexpected sounds such as percussion generated by tapping on his bass.

 

CleverJoe.com – May 2004 May 11, 2004

CleverJoe.com may 2004
CleverJoe’s indie band top picks

http://www.cleverjoe.com/
http://www.cleverjoe.com/newsletter_may_2004.html
Drum & Bass Society – Joseph Patrick Moore

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1


Although CleverJoe generally tries to select artists from the abundant good music within the thriving Canadian indie music scene, once in awhile a CD comes across his desk that really kicks his ass (which is somewhat strange because CleverJoe, one dimensional as he is, has no ass, nor for that matter a desk).

A few weeks ago, Joe was rolling along the 401, whistling a tune vaguely inspired by a song Bob Dylan once borrowed. The CD arrived a couple weeks earlier and busy as he is, Clever had not read the accompanying press release. So with no preconceptions, he reached over and popped in Joseph Patrick’s Moore’ Drum & Bass Society CD, pressed play and rolled the window down a crack.

There’s no looking back baby.

Mmmm… sweet, jazzy and intelligent, this is a great CD that goes on evolving each time it’s listened to. A mostly instrumental CD, featuring a healthy dose of uniquely arranged cover tunes backed by a solid live band with funkadelic bass, percussion, horns, woodwinds and strings.

With a peppering of electronica and soundscapes, Drum & Bass Society wanders through some unique covers of tunes by Phish, Tony Williams, Men at Work, The Specials and the Fixx. A few songs do feature a vocalist, most notably Temple Passmore on the opening track ‘Down Under‘.


Arranged by Joseph Patrick Moore, a 34 year old bassist from Knoxville, TN, Moore’s influences include Herbie Hancock, John Coltrane, The Police and Charlie Parker. Traces of all can be heard throughout the extended jams and instrument solos on the hour long CD.

The music definitely grows on you in a laid back sort of way . CleverJoe recommends you do yourself a favour and high tail it to JPM’s web site and have a taste of some Drum & Bass Society yourself. Your day will be better for it. http://www.josephpatrickmoore.com

CleverJoe Tip: This is road trip music at it’s best.

 

HotBands.com – March 2004 March 1, 2004

hotbands.com

Joseph Patrick Moore’s Drum & Bass Society Vol 1. – CD Review
By Patrick Ferris

 

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

 

 

Joseph Patrick Moore aka JPM is a bass virtuoso originally from Knoxville, Tennessee, now residing in Atlanta, Georgia. The winner of multiple national awards and scholarships for music excellence, JPM’s musical track record reads like a who’s who of the jazz world, and has made him one of the most sought-after studio bassists on the East Coast.

JPM’s most recent CD, Drum & Bass Society Vol 1. is an eclectic selection of arrangements in the genre of fusion jazz. JPM has assembled some of the finest studio heavies to create what I would call ‘A Musician’s Album’. Drum & Bass Society Vol 1. might be beyond the intellectual grasp of the average Joe, but is ideal for musicians wanting to hear cutting edge fusion arrangements and precision instrumentation with an emphasis on JPM’s incredible bass chops. Influences from Miles Davis, Herbie Hancock and Weather Report are felt as well as elements of hip-hop and sampling. There is even a concept feel that gives a new spin on this particular flavor of acid-jazz fusion.

For more information on Joseph Patrick Moore’s Drum & Bass Society, check out his website:

 

 
%d bloggers like this: