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Double Bassist Magazine – August 2002 August 6, 2002

Double Bassist – August 2002
Autumn #22
Review by Malcolm Creese
Double Bassist Website

Alone Together

Alone Together

This is an extraordinary album of bass-only music by a highly talented and versatile American player. Joseph Patrick Moore visits classical, jazz and pop genres in this showcase collection, most of the 15 short titles are his, and he employs a myriad of studio devices to achieve a surprisingly complete sound. There are delays, loops, harmonics, echoes, multi-tracking and synthesizer effects. Moore is a fine player on double bass, bass guitar with and without frets and even the occasional vocal. The bottom end is obviously well catered for, but he higher registers are also there in abundance, and with accuracy and clarity. Heaven knows how many strings the various bass guitars have (lots!), but the music never sounds muddy or bottom-heavy. Moore’s fretless playing is reminiscent of the great Jaco Pastorius‘ impact on the fretless bass was so overwhemling that it is difficult not to sound like him on this instrument. Moore dedicates a track to some others who influenced him – including Dave Holland and Ron Carter – and his choice of a song by Sting gives another clue as to his list of mentors. As an extra bonus the funky Bobby McFerrin track Drive is included on the CD in video format, where the youthful Moore gives a solo bass guitar performance in what
looks like his living room.

 

An Honest Tune – June 2001 June 21, 2001

An Honest Tune, June/2001
Review by Bryan Irby

Soul Cloud

Soul Cloud

New BlueGround UnderGrass bassist Joseph Moore (ex-Fiji Mariners/Planet Zambee) has just released a second solo album on his own independent label MMP. SOUL CLOUD continues in the same contemporary jazz vein as his 1996 release NEVER NEVER LAND. While much of this material is a bit too smooth for my jazz tastes there are some definite funky highlights like ASHES TO ASHES, MUMPHIS COSANOSTRA, and DATZ IT, all 3 which feature Yonrico Scott (Derek Trucks Band) on drums and Jimmy Herring on guitar. The simpler, bass-centric tunes on the album are also among the best tracks. Pause#3 is a bass, sitar & drum free-jazz piece dedicated to Miles Davis Drummer Tony Williams (Pause 1 and 2 on NEVER NEVER LAND were dedicated to Miles Davis and Jaco Pastorius). BIG BUTT BASS is exactly that: in-yer-face solo slap bass, and there’s a nice bass & saxophone take on Led Zepplin’s GOING TO CALIFORNIA. These tunes and the hidden track ANOTHER DAY ANOTHER TIME ( a beautiful rainy-day-in-Memphis piece) outshine the title track and a cover of DUST IN THE WIND which I find unlistenable.

Catch Joseph Patrick Moore on tour with BlueGround UnderGrass or his own group.

 

Commercial Appeal – January 21, 2001 January 21, 2001

Commercial Appeal, January 21, 2001
Memphis, TN
Review by Bill Ellis

Soul Cloud

Soul Cloud

Based in Atlanta, former Memphis Groovetet bass player Joseph Patrick Moore funks up his considerable jazz chops on SOULCLOUD which lies in the Yellowjackets/Weather Report vein through with a more rocking jam band attack at times (the highlight MUMPHIS COSONOSTRA). Moore even arranges Led Zeppelin’s GOIN’ TO CALIFORNIA – a gentle bass sax duet – and Kansas’s Dust in the Wind which, as the record’s one misstep, is a pretty awkward one. The smooth fusion compositions by Moore and keyboardist Frank Amato benefit from the leader’s melodic grooves and give room for numerous fretboard workouts a la inspiration Jaco Pastorius. The disc’s horn players equally shine. Not many folks can walk this familar yet demanding walk. Moore, a member of Col. Bruce Hampton & the Fiji Mainers in its final year- does and convincingly so.

Catch him in town February 3rd, 2001 at Legends with BlueGround UnderGrass on Beale. Street.

 

Independent Memphis Music Magazine – Winter 1996/1997 December 30, 1996

Independent Memphis Music Magazine, Winter 96/97
vol.1/number 3
Review by Scott Bojko

Never Never Land

Never Never Land

 

Having seen bassist Joey Moore perform with local jazz saxophonist Carl Wolfe, as well as with a spare trio, I was curious about why he risked sounding pretentious by affecting Joseph Patrick Moore for his album, NNL. The music explains: Joey Moore is the competent young sideman, Joseph Patrick Moore is the mature jazz artist, composer, and leader-no pretense. Moore’s Jazz is contemporary, with flavorings from cool to eclectic funk to nature sounds. But let labels neither attract nor deter – just listen to the soundscapes that Moore creates. Eavesdrop on a conversation as trumpet, sax, clarinet, piano, and B3 organ trade licks on SEX IN SPACE. Let BRAVE UP ride you in an agile sports car, with responsive shifts, straight-and-turns, ups-and-downs. Experience a mist, mystical rainforest in the title track. Ponder life while strolling cosmopolitan parks and streets in some CORNER OF THE WORLD. Or heck, just mellow out on the music.

Moore produced, and composed or arranged, the entire album. In addition to the bass gamut, he performs on a slew of instruments. MOMENT TO MOMENT credits Moore on everything: 5string electric and distorted fretless bass, intro voice, drum design and fills, piano, triangles, bells, shakers, strings, harp, horns. Busy guy. Beyond conventional winds, keys and drums, Moore uses all sorts of auxiliary percussion, electronics, and effects, to add intriguint accents or to weave textures under and around melodies. He gets help from two dozen featured players, including Wolfe, Harmonica cat Pete Peterson, and Posey Hedges, who co-produced. This album includes two brief dedications to jazz icons which seem to say, thanks for your inspiration, hope you like how I’ve made it my own thing. the first PAUSE honors Miles Davis, whowould scowl appreciatively at Moore’s fusion of turntable scratching with cool muted trumpet and funky bass, ending with a racing tempo transition, the kind Miles could propel telepathically in his 60’s quintet. In PAUSE 2 for Jaco Pastorius, the solo Moore invokes the late bassist’s blurry, fretless slurs, harmonics, and chording. Another homage is Moore’s slick, all-bass rendition of Coltrane’s GIANT STEPS, employing upright, distorted fretless and 5 string electric.

NNL is an impressive achievement. Listen. Appreciate how the jazz mosaic transforms as dynamic sound images, or just funks around. You get the feeling tthat Moore has lots of experimental and improvisational inventions percolating. Under any moniker, let’s hear more Moore.

 

The Commercial Appeal – September 28th, 1996 September 28, 1996

The Commercial Appeal, September 28th, 1996
Review by Bill Ellis
Memphis, TN
The Commercial Appeal

Never Never Land

Never Never Land

If ever a case could be made for an ongoing jazz scene in Memphis, Moore’s disc is it. The bass player’s hand-picked ensemble is a roll call of the best of the best, including Jim Spake, Carl Wolfe, trumpeters Scott Thompson and Bill Mobley and clarinetist Lannie McMillian. Heard as well is Hammond B-3 organ phenom Charlie Wood and DDT Big Band singer Kelly Hurt, who adds a silky scat to one tune.

That Moore could gather such esteemed talent for his self-produced disc speaks volumes of the jazz bassman’s talents. Moore, who has been featured in notable guitar magazines, plays around town these days with the Memphis Groovetet. His funky bass lines will bring to mind Stanley Clarke and Jaco Pastorius, which is not bad company. He even does an all-bass arrangement of Coltrane’s Giant Steps that makes such recent bass arranged efforts by Rob Wasserman puerile in comparison.

Full of melodic invention and deft charts, Moore’s own compositions are much more than excuses to jam (something Pastorius wasn’t always sensitive to). Moore’s locally made NNL can hold its own with any national contemporary jazz record on the market today and deserves major label distribution.

 

 
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