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Knoxville News Sentinel – January 19th, 1997 January 19, 1997

Knoxville News Sentinel January 19, 1997
Showtime
Review by Wayne Bledsoe
Knoxville News Sentinel

Never Never Land

Never Never Land

Former Knoxvillian Joseph Patrick Moore has taken his funky bass to the wilds of Memphis. The bassist’s new disc, NEVER NEVER LAND is a likable collection of old fashioned funk and jazz fusion. The disc also features some of the cream of the Memphis Jazz scene. Cool tunes, including INTUITION and CORNER OF THE WORLD, are easy to listen to but are an edge above much of the lite jazz on the market. Moore and the band play with thought and feeling, and every now and then toss in a hot surprise. Some of the best cuts are filled with nice brass work, and soprano saxophonist Jim Spake often stands out in the talented group.

The disc may be hard to find, but its worth searching for.

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The Commercial Appeal – September 28th, 1996 September 28, 1996

The Commercial Appeal, September 28th, 1996
Review by Bill Ellis
Memphis, TN
The Commercial Appeal

Never Never Land

Never Never Land

If ever a case could be made for an ongoing jazz scene in Memphis, Moore’s disc is it. The bass player’s hand-picked ensemble is a roll call of the best of the best, including Jim Spake, Carl Wolfe, trumpeters Scott Thompson and Bill Mobley and clarinetist Lannie McMillian. Heard as well is Hammond B-3 organ phenom Charlie Wood and DDT Big Band singer Kelly Hurt, who adds a silky scat to one tune.

That Moore could gather such esteemed talent for his self-produced disc speaks volumes of the jazz bassman’s talents. Moore, who has been featured in notable guitar magazines, plays around town these days with the Memphis Groovetet. His funky bass lines will bring to mind Stanley Clarke and Jaco Pastorius, which is not bad company. He even does an all-bass arrangement of Coltrane’s Giant Steps that makes such recent bass arranged efforts by Rob Wasserman puerile in comparison.

Full of melodic invention and deft charts, Moore’s own compositions are much more than excuses to jam (something Pastorius wasn’t always sensitive to). Moore’s locally made NNL can hold its own with any national contemporary jazz record on the market today and deserves major label distribution.

 

 
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