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AllAboutJazz.com – August 2004 August 1, 2004

AllAboutJazz.com – August 2004
Review by: Mark Sabbatini

 

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

 

When an album opens with a quirky reinterpretation of the 1980s hit “Down Under” it’s safe to assume the artist is looking to have a good time. Joseph Patrick Moore succeeds to a degree in bringing listeners along on Drum And Bass Society, Vol. 1, even if the cast of players doesn’t quite let its collective hair down enough to make this a consistent fun fest throughout. It’s an all-over-the-map jam band romp where nobody’s the life of the party, but almost everyone has something interesting to say if you focus on them amidst the din.

 

The fifteen tracks include seven originals by the bass player, plus reinterpretations of hits by groups such as Phish, The Specials, and The Fixx. It’s a radical departure from Moore’s 2002 multi-tracked solo album Alone Together, with the new release featuring more than twenty musicians and only a couple of songs where Moore solos—his arranging of this huge cast is the main contribution.

 

The most unfortunate moment is Moore’s slow reggae treatment of “Down Under,” which might have been a readily identifiable crowd-pleaser, but instead comes across as unimaginative and badly at odds with the album’s overall beat. The vocals are played straight and the instrumentalists avoid anything notable for a radio-safe four minutes. The concept works much better on “One Thing Leads To Another” as one of the wind players takes over immediately on flute and doesn’t let go throughout a peppery string of phrases. It’s hardly the inspired madness of the Bad Plus, but is a plus rather than a minus to the album.

 

Speaking of inspired madness, some of the better moments of it occur on the hybrid world/funk/whatever collage of “Cheesefrog Funk.” “Groove Messenger” delivers a decent bit of fusion in the style of Miles Davis, who Moore cites as one of his big influences. And the scope of variety can be seen on the rather flute-heavy New Agey “Rain Dance” and the almost mainstream jazz of “Herbie,” a tribute to pianist Herbie Hancock.

 

The CD, released on Moore’s Blue Canoe Records, has a $9 list price, and two songs, “Jamband Express” and “Groove Messenger (The Story of Jazztronica),” are available as free MP3 downloads from Moore’s web site and online vendors such as Amazon.com .

 

Moore has proven a solid player in a variety of settings since appearing on the recording scene in the mid 1990s, and this album ranks well among his releases. Fans wanting to hear him in this setting will likely be satisfied and new listeners of such music will find it worthwhile to at least investigate the free previews. Those wanting to hear his playing will find Alone Together a better and also intriguing bet, since the overdubbing includes unexpected sounds such as percussion generated by tapping on his bass.

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University Of Idaho – The Argonaut – May 2004 May 4, 2004

University of Idaho, May 2004
By Jon Hammond
Argonaut Staff

http://www.argonaut.uidaho.edu/archives/050704/art3.html

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1


Bassist Joseph Patrick Moore’s latest release, “Drum & Bass Society-Vol. 1,” experiments with many styles and instrumental groupings in a way that can only be described as eclectic. Each song displays a different mix of sounds and personnel, ranging from the violin, mandolin and flute to heavily sampled drum machine tracks and echoey voices.

The album’s jazz influence is easy to hear on tracks like “Groove Messenger (The Story of Jazztronica),” where Vance Thompson’s trumpet improvisations and Frank Amato’s work on the Fender Rhodes keyboard recall Miles Davis’ recordings of the late ’60s and early ’70s. But when Moore does jazz it is wholly original, preferring a sampled trip-hop beat to the traditional drum kit sound

Just as easily as the electric jazz element is established, other tracks stick to a more pop sound. While Moore’s arrangements of Men at Work’s “Down Under” or The Fixx’s “One Thing Leads to Another” aren’t the highlights of this CD, they do provide an interesting contrast to the album’s more ethereal wanderings.

Other songs covered by Moore and his band stay closer to the group’s “jam band” sound. Jazz drummer Tony Williams“Creatures of Conscience” allows drummer Jeff Sipe to stretch out and show his chops, while “Heavy Things,” written by the band Phish, mixes jazzlike improvisation with programmed, Alvin-and-the-Chipmunks-esque vocals.


Moore’s technical ability on his instrument is solid, but he isn’t overly showy. In fact, on several tracks, including the album’s opener “Down Under,” he stays out of the way and lets the other instruments shine.

“Drum & Bass Society-Vol. 1” is quality recording with something a little different on each of its 15 tracks.

 

Kweevak.com – May 2004 May 1, 2004

Kweevak.com
By Laura Turner Lynch
Kweevak.com
http://www.kweevak.com/rd_cd_reviews_archive_02.htm

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1


JOSEPH PATRICK MOOREDRUM & BASS SOCIETY VOLUME 1: Drum & Bass Society is the fourth release from bassist, multi-instrumentalist,
composer and producer Joseph Patrick Moore (JPM). Joseph’s influences vary from jazz greats Miles Davis and Coltrain to modern rockers such as The Police. JPM has worked with many musicians and he has played on over forty recordings from other artists. Drum & Bass Society is a fifteen-track collection that includes seven originals, five innovative covers and three quick interludes. The CD is an eclectic mix ranging from jazz, rock, world and so much more. Many talented players contribute to this dynamic collection. ‘Ghost Town’ features haunting sounds and vocals with diverse instrumentation. Funky beats blend with the mandolin and pedal steel to create an evocative modern jazz song. ‘Groove Messenger’ is an up-tempo jazz number that features dynamic drumming including the congas and an udu drum. Joseph crafts smooth cool beats on an acoustic bass as a subtle mandolin melds with a trumpet, a tenor sax and a soprano saxophone. This song has a lot of flavor and first-rate musicianship. JPM’s interpretation of The Fixx’s ‘One Thing Leads to Another’ is acoustic based. The highlight of the song is the flute leads and other solos giving this rock hit a more improvisational direction. JPM has compiled an eclectic mix of exotic mostly instrumental songs that are masterful!


• Recommended Tracks: (2,3,6)

 

HotBands.com – March 2004 March 1, 2004

hotbands.com

Joseph Patrick Moore’s Drum & Bass Society Vol 1. – CD Review
By Patrick Ferris

 

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

 

 

Joseph Patrick Moore aka JPM is a bass virtuoso originally from Knoxville, Tennessee, now residing in Atlanta, Georgia. The winner of multiple national awards and scholarships for music excellence, JPM’s musical track record reads like a who’s who of the jazz world, and has made him one of the most sought-after studio bassists on the East Coast.

JPM’s most recent CD, Drum & Bass Society Vol 1. is an eclectic selection of arrangements in the genre of fusion jazz. JPM has assembled some of the finest studio heavies to create what I would call ‘A Musician’s Album’. Drum & Bass Society Vol 1. might be beyond the intellectual grasp of the average Joe, but is ideal for musicians wanting to hear cutting edge fusion arrangements and precision instrumentation with an emphasis on JPM’s incredible bass chops. Influences from Miles Davis, Herbie Hancock and Weather Report are felt as well as elements of hip-hop and sampling. There is even a concept feel that gives a new spin on this particular flavor of acid-jazz fusion.

For more information on Joseph Patrick Moore’s Drum & Bass Society, check out his website:

 

An Honest Tune – June 2001 June 21, 2001

An Honest Tune, June/2001
Review by Bryan Irby

Soul Cloud

Soul Cloud

New BlueGround UnderGrass bassist Joseph Moore (ex-Fiji Mariners/Planet Zambee) has just released a second solo album on his own independent label MMP. SOUL CLOUD continues in the same contemporary jazz vein as his 1996 release NEVER NEVER LAND. While much of this material is a bit too smooth for my jazz tastes there are some definite funky highlights like ASHES TO ASHES, MUMPHIS COSANOSTRA, and DATZ IT, all 3 which feature Yonrico Scott (Derek Trucks Band) on drums and Jimmy Herring on guitar. The simpler, bass-centric tunes on the album are also among the best tracks. Pause#3 is a bass, sitar & drum free-jazz piece dedicated to Miles Davis Drummer Tony Williams (Pause 1 and 2 on NEVER NEVER LAND were dedicated to Miles Davis and Jaco Pastorius). BIG BUTT BASS is exactly that: in-yer-face solo slap bass, and there’s a nice bass & saxophone take on Led Zepplin’s GOING TO CALIFORNIA. These tunes and the hidden track ANOTHER DAY ANOTHER TIME ( a beautiful rainy-day-in-Memphis piece) outshine the title track and a cover of DUST IN THE WIND which I find unlistenable.

Catch Joseph Patrick Moore on tour with BlueGround UnderGrass or his own group.

 

Independent Memphis Music Magazine – Winter 1996/1997 December 30, 1996

Independent Memphis Music Magazine, Winter 96/97
vol.1/number 3
Review by Scott Bojko

Never Never Land

Never Never Land

 

Having seen bassist Joey Moore perform with local jazz saxophonist Carl Wolfe, as well as with a spare trio, I was curious about why he risked sounding pretentious by affecting Joseph Patrick Moore for his album, NNL. The music explains: Joey Moore is the competent young sideman, Joseph Patrick Moore is the mature jazz artist, composer, and leader-no pretense. Moore’s Jazz is contemporary, with flavorings from cool to eclectic funk to nature sounds. But let labels neither attract nor deter – just listen to the soundscapes that Moore creates. Eavesdrop on a conversation as trumpet, sax, clarinet, piano, and B3 organ trade licks on SEX IN SPACE. Let BRAVE UP ride you in an agile sports car, with responsive shifts, straight-and-turns, ups-and-downs. Experience a mist, mystical rainforest in the title track. Ponder life while strolling cosmopolitan parks and streets in some CORNER OF THE WORLD. Or heck, just mellow out on the music.

Moore produced, and composed or arranged, the entire album. In addition to the bass gamut, he performs on a slew of instruments. MOMENT TO MOMENT credits Moore on everything: 5string electric and distorted fretless bass, intro voice, drum design and fills, piano, triangles, bells, shakers, strings, harp, horns. Busy guy. Beyond conventional winds, keys and drums, Moore uses all sorts of auxiliary percussion, electronics, and effects, to add intriguint accents or to weave textures under and around melodies. He gets help from two dozen featured players, including Wolfe, Harmonica cat Pete Peterson, and Posey Hedges, who co-produced. This album includes two brief dedications to jazz icons which seem to say, thanks for your inspiration, hope you like how I’ve made it my own thing. the first PAUSE honors Miles Davis, whowould scowl appreciatively at Moore’s fusion of turntable scratching with cool muted trumpet and funky bass, ending with a racing tempo transition, the kind Miles could propel telepathically in his 60’s quintet. In PAUSE 2 for Jaco Pastorius, the solo Moore invokes the late bassist’s blurry, fretless slurs, harmonics, and chording. Another homage is Moore’s slick, all-bass rendition of Coltrane’s GIANT STEPS, employing upright, distorted fretless and 5 string electric.

NNL is an impressive achievement. Listen. Appreciate how the jazz mosaic transforms as dynamic sound images, or just funks around. You get the feeling tthat Moore has lots of experimental and improvisational inventions percolating. Under any moniker, let’s hear more Moore.

 

Guitar World – 1994 June 19, 1994

Guitar World, June 1994
Hometown Heroes
Mike Varney

GuitarWorld.com

Joseph Patrick Moore – Memphis, TN

MAIN BASS: Pedulla 5 string, Kohler Upright
INFLUENCES: Miles Davis, Donald Brown, Marcus Miller 
STYLE: jazz, r&b, Hip Hop

“A musician with a broad musical background.  Joseph Moore began playing saxophone in elementary school and played drums  in the high school band. At 16, he took up bass guitar and began playing live just one year later. After high school, Joseph began playing upright bass and majored in music at the University of Tennessee. Over the last four years, Joseph has garnered acclaim for his playing in a variety of settings, including symphony orchestras and with artists as diverse as jazz rapper Gil Scott Heron and unrepentant folky Judy Collins. He’s also been working on his music performance degree at Memphis State University. On his four song demo tape Joseph plays electric bass keyboards and guitars, as well as programming the drum machines. His songs feature innovative changes which maintain a flowing groove.  Wheter he’s slapping, poppin, slidding, flawing or finessing. Fans of contemporary jazz fusion bass work should find his demo to be of great interest.” – Mike Varney

 

 
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