Joseph Patrick Moore's

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AllAboutJazz.com – August 2004 August 1, 2004

AllAboutJazz.com – August 2004
Review by: Mark Sabbatini

 

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

 

When an album opens with a quirky reinterpretation of the 1980s hit “Down Under” it’s safe to assume the artist is looking to have a good time. Joseph Patrick Moore succeeds to a degree in bringing listeners along on Drum And Bass Society, Vol. 1, even if the cast of players doesn’t quite let its collective hair down enough to make this a consistent fun fest throughout. It’s an all-over-the-map jam band romp where nobody’s the life of the party, but almost everyone has something interesting to say if you focus on them amidst the din.

 

The fifteen tracks include seven originals by the bass player, plus reinterpretations of hits by groups such as Phish, The Specials, and The Fixx. It’s a radical departure from Moore’s 2002 multi-tracked solo album Alone Together, with the new release featuring more than twenty musicians and only a couple of songs where Moore solos—his arranging of this huge cast is the main contribution.

 

The most unfortunate moment is Moore’s slow reggae treatment of “Down Under,” which might have been a readily identifiable crowd-pleaser, but instead comes across as unimaginative and badly at odds with the album’s overall beat. The vocals are played straight and the instrumentalists avoid anything notable for a radio-safe four minutes. The concept works much better on “One Thing Leads To Another” as one of the wind players takes over immediately on flute and doesn’t let go throughout a peppery string of phrases. It’s hardly the inspired madness of the Bad Plus, but is a plus rather than a minus to the album.

 

Speaking of inspired madness, some of the better moments of it occur on the hybrid world/funk/whatever collage of “Cheesefrog Funk.” “Groove Messenger” delivers a decent bit of fusion in the style of Miles Davis, who Moore cites as one of his big influences. And the scope of variety can be seen on the rather flute-heavy New Agey “Rain Dance” and the almost mainstream jazz of “Herbie,” a tribute to pianist Herbie Hancock.

 

The CD, released on Moore’s Blue Canoe Records, has a $9 list price, and two songs, “Jamband Express” and “Groove Messenger (The Story of Jazztronica),” are available as free MP3 downloads from Moore’s web site and online vendors such as Amazon.com .

 

Moore has proven a solid player in a variety of settings since appearing on the recording scene in the mid 1990s, and this album ranks well among his releases. Fans wanting to hear him in this setting will likely be satisfied and new listeners of such music will find it worthwhile to at least investigate the free previews. Those wanting to hear his playing will find Alone Together a better and also intriguing bet, since the overdubbing includes unexpected sounds such as percussion generated by tapping on his bass.

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An Honest Tune – June 2004 June 1, 2004

An Honest Tune June 2004

Vol. 5 No.3, Summer 2004
Review by Fred Adams
An Honest Tune Site

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

Joseph Patrick Moore’s Drum & Bass Society, Volume 1 has got to be one of the most intriguing new releases of the year. From the moment the disc begins, with a new spin on Men at Work’sDown Under,’ it is rapidly apparent that this Tennessee native’s musical odyssey is unlike anything else coming from the South, or anywhere else for that matter.

As much a composer as a bassist, the majority of the songs on this, Moore’s fourth solo release, are (very) original. From beginning to end, the songs are all well written, uniquely arranged, and performed with a confidence and purity of a performer doing something he obviously loves. While all of the material is strong, songs such as ‘Creatures of Conscience’ (featuring guest appearances by ARU alumni Count M’ Butu and Jeff Sipe), ‘Datz It’ (featuring Moore’s former Fiji Mariner band mate Dr. Dan Matrazzo on keyboards, along with Johnny Mosier on guitar), and the ‘Cheese Frog Funk‘ trilogy leave little doubt that this is an artist whose vast talents span many musical genres, from new age to jazz to reggae.

Jamband Express,’ also featuring Jeff Sipe on drums, is another masterfully played, and deceptively titled, track. While the songs name may lead one to expect sounds similar to the bass Moore became known for as he joined Col. Bruce Hampton’s Fiji Mariners, not even a trace of his jam scene influences can be heard here. The track actually sounds more suited to be heard as the theme of a TV show, or movie soundtrack, than something one would hear on today’s jam scene.

While his own compositions are strong, Moore also seems to take great joy, and possess tremendous talents, in rearranging the material of others. Besides the aforementioned ‘Down Under,’ Moore also gives new life to another 80s pop hit, The Fixx’sOne Thing Leads to Another‘ (sung by George and Caroline Pond of Snake Oil Medicine Show), as well as Phish’sHeavy Things‘.

Regardless of the genre he pursues, Moore plays with the class, style and skills of a man whose life is devoted to his craft. While his compositions may never lend themselves to mass commercial appeal or radio play, Drum & Bass Society proves Moore belongs in the elite echelon of today’s newest, and brightest, stars of the new age jazz world.

 

Talkbass – November 2000 November 13, 2000

Talkbass, November 2000
Review by June Rhee
www.talkbass.com

Soul Cloud

Soul Cloud

The first image that came to mind when I listened to SoulCloud, which features bassist Joseph Patrick Moore’s original compositions, was a swank nightclub patroned by hipsters cloaked in black leather at some unidentified New York venue. Tipping its hat to 1970s funk, this CD contains talented musicians and tight ensemble work, both of which are further strengthened by a quality recording. Solo highlights include trumpeter Vance Thompson on track 4, pianist Bill Anschell on track 2, and drummer Phillip Smith on track 5, not to mention Moore’s own bass prowess, which he shows off on an intense bass solo that evokes memoirs of Seinfeldesque city streets entitled BIG BUTT BASS. The name yells it all.

This is a strong CD, much to Moore’s credit. However, while swank isn’t necessarily a bad image, nearly 9 tracks of it does lend itself to leaving the listener rather musically parched. The instrumentation on 6 of the 9 tracks – bass, guitar, brass, drums, keyboards has little variation, and the structure of the pieces felt rather convoluted at times until the solos kicked in. The ensemble in general lacked a certain spark, incited when the members click perfectly together on a personal and musical level.  Rather, I heard several talented musicians playing different instruments at the same time. Perhaps on the next CD Moore can experiment with his setup through utilizing a smaller group of musicians or varying the instrumentation on more tracks.

Moore’s arrangement of GOING TO CALIFORNIA was beautiful, providing a welcome respite from the dark, underground atmosphere of the earlier tracks. Most worthy of note was his jazzed-up arrangement of DUST IN THE WIND, to be avoided by any of you Kansas purists out there. I, on the other hand, highly enjoyed the brisk, sunny-side-up mood.

These shortcomings did little to detract from my coffee and Nutella morning ritual, however. I indeed look forward to and hope to hear more of this bassist’s creations.

 

Bass Frontiers Magazine – March/April 1997 March 20, 1997

Bass Frontiers Magazine April/March 1997
Vol. #4/Number 2, page 55
Review by Jim Hyatt

Never Never Land

Never Never Land

I really like Joseph Patrick Moore’s new CD release. Joseph is a multi-faceted bassist who is equally skilled on fretted fretless and upright basses.  His compositions are mature and seasoned nicely with dashes of originality  and freshness. My only hope is that he gets signed to a label that can  give him widespread distribution.

Good job Mr. Moore!

Review by Jim Hyatt

 

Knoxville News Sentinel – January 19th, 1997 January 19, 1997

Knoxville News Sentinel January 19, 1997
Showtime
Review by Wayne Bledsoe
Knoxville News Sentinel

Never Never Land

Never Never Land

Former Knoxvillian Joseph Patrick Moore has taken his funky bass to the wilds of Memphis. The bassist’s new disc, NEVER NEVER LAND is a likable collection of old fashioned funk and jazz fusion. The disc also features some of the cream of the Memphis Jazz scene. Cool tunes, including INTUITION and CORNER OF THE WORLD, are easy to listen to but are an edge above much of the lite jazz on the market. Moore and the band play with thought and feeling, and every now and then toss in a hot surprise. Some of the best cuts are filled with nice brass work, and soprano saxophonist Jim Spake often stands out in the talented group.

The disc may be hard to find, but its worth searching for.

 

Independent Memphis Music Magazine – Winter 1996/1997 December 30, 1996

Independent Memphis Music Magazine, Winter 96/97
vol.1/number 3
Review by Scott Bojko

Never Never Land

Never Never Land

 

Having seen bassist Joey Moore perform with local jazz saxophonist Carl Wolfe, as well as with a spare trio, I was curious about why he risked sounding pretentious by affecting Joseph Patrick Moore for his album, NNL. The music explains: Joey Moore is the competent young sideman, Joseph Patrick Moore is the mature jazz artist, composer, and leader-no pretense. Moore’s Jazz is contemporary, with flavorings from cool to eclectic funk to nature sounds. But let labels neither attract nor deter – just listen to the soundscapes that Moore creates. Eavesdrop on a conversation as trumpet, sax, clarinet, piano, and B3 organ trade licks on SEX IN SPACE. Let BRAVE UP ride you in an agile sports car, with responsive shifts, straight-and-turns, ups-and-downs. Experience a mist, mystical rainforest in the title track. Ponder life while strolling cosmopolitan parks and streets in some CORNER OF THE WORLD. Or heck, just mellow out on the music.

Moore produced, and composed or arranged, the entire album. In addition to the bass gamut, he performs on a slew of instruments. MOMENT TO MOMENT credits Moore on everything: 5string electric and distorted fretless bass, intro voice, drum design and fills, piano, triangles, bells, shakers, strings, harp, horns. Busy guy. Beyond conventional winds, keys and drums, Moore uses all sorts of auxiliary percussion, electronics, and effects, to add intriguint accents or to weave textures under and around melodies. He gets help from two dozen featured players, including Wolfe, Harmonica cat Pete Peterson, and Posey Hedges, who co-produced. This album includes two brief dedications to jazz icons which seem to say, thanks for your inspiration, hope you like how I’ve made it my own thing. the first PAUSE honors Miles Davis, whowould scowl appreciatively at Moore’s fusion of turntable scratching with cool muted trumpet and funky bass, ending with a racing tempo transition, the kind Miles could propel telepathically in his 60’s quintet. In PAUSE 2 for Jaco Pastorius, the solo Moore invokes the late bassist’s blurry, fretless slurs, harmonics, and chording. Another homage is Moore’s slick, all-bass rendition of Coltrane’s GIANT STEPS, employing upright, distorted fretless and 5 string electric.

NNL is an impressive achievement. Listen. Appreciate how the jazz mosaic transforms as dynamic sound images, or just funks around. You get the feeling tthat Moore has lots of experimental and improvisational inventions percolating. Under any moniker, let’s hear more Moore.

 

The Commercial Appeal – September 28th, 1996 September 28, 1996

The Commercial Appeal, September 28th, 1996
Review by Bill Ellis
Memphis, TN
The Commercial Appeal

Never Never Land

Never Never Land

If ever a case could be made for an ongoing jazz scene in Memphis, Moore’s disc is it. The bass player’s hand-picked ensemble is a roll call of the best of the best, including Jim Spake, Carl Wolfe, trumpeters Scott Thompson and Bill Mobley and clarinetist Lannie McMillian. Heard as well is Hammond B-3 organ phenom Charlie Wood and DDT Big Band singer Kelly Hurt, who adds a silky scat to one tune.

That Moore could gather such esteemed talent for his self-produced disc speaks volumes of the jazz bassman’s talents. Moore, who has been featured in notable guitar magazines, plays around town these days with the Memphis Groovetet. His funky bass lines will bring to mind Stanley Clarke and Jaco Pastorius, which is not bad company. He even does an all-bass arrangement of Coltrane’s Giant Steps that makes such recent bass arranged efforts by Rob Wasserman puerile in comparison.

Full of melodic invention and deft charts, Moore’s own compositions are much more than excuses to jam (something Pastorius wasn’t always sensitive to). Moore’s locally made NNL can hold its own with any national contemporary jazz record on the market today and deserves major label distribution.

 

 
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