Joseph Patrick Moore's

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Sea Of Tranquility – January 18, 2006 January 18, 2006

 

 

Live in 05'

Live in 05'

Bassist Joseph Patrick Moore’s latest album Live in 05 is a fun and spirited jazz-fusion collection of songs recorded at This House Rocks in Atlanta, Georgia on April 2nd, 2005. Moore has been busy over the last few years, putting out a few albums of his own as well as appearing on various other artist’s recordings. Here, he and his crack band of Al Smith on keyboards, drummer Jon Chalden, EWI player Al Mcspadden, and percussionist Emrah Kotan really give a five performance on eleven tracks of smokin’ and funky fusion, melodic cool jazz, and progressive tinged improvisations. 

Moore himself is a very smooth player with some serious chops, whether he is laying down deep grooves or lean melodic solos on electric, fretless, or double bass. Fans of Victor Bailey, Gary Willis, John Pattitucci, Stanley Clarke, and Marcus Miller, will instantly dig Moore’s energetic style. Although there are plenty of great bass solos on the album, the live setting affords his bandmates to also get in on the action, especially keyboard player Smith, who launches into a wild synth frenzy on the funky “Gypsy Moon Father Sun”. He also provides a nice melodic foundation in which Moore can dig into some serious popping bass lines on the light jazz piece “Fall”. Drummers will love the percussion/drum spotlight “Drum Dance”, which allows Chalden and Kotan some room to show off before the song segues into the fine “Datz It (version 2005)”, a song with plenty of funk bass melodies and 70’s styled electric piano.

Ultimately it comes down to compositions, and Moore is no slouch in that department. These are all memorable tunes with catchy melodies, which go along just fine with the solid chops of the band. So if you in the mood for some well played and melodic modern jazz fusion, you can’t go wrong with Live in 05.
Track Listing 
1. SoulCloud 
2. Mystery 
3. Prayer of Solitude 
4. Chief Dagga 
5. Gypsy Moon Father Sun 
6. Bless You 
7. Fall 
8. Bebop Charlie 
9. What? 
10. Drum Dance 
11. Datz It (version 2005)

Added: January 18th 2006
Reviewer: Pete Pardo
Score: 

 

AllAboutJazz.com – August 2004 August 1, 2004

AllAboutJazz.com – August 2004
Review by: Mark Sabbatini

 

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

 

When an album opens with a quirky reinterpretation of the 1980s hit “Down Under” it’s safe to assume the artist is looking to have a good time. Joseph Patrick Moore succeeds to a degree in bringing listeners along on Drum And Bass Society, Vol. 1, even if the cast of players doesn’t quite let its collective hair down enough to make this a consistent fun fest throughout. It’s an all-over-the-map jam band romp where nobody’s the life of the party, but almost everyone has something interesting to say if you focus on them amidst the din.

 

The fifteen tracks include seven originals by the bass player, plus reinterpretations of hits by groups such as Phish, The Specials, and The Fixx. It’s a radical departure from Moore’s 2002 multi-tracked solo album Alone Together, with the new release featuring more than twenty musicians and only a couple of songs where Moore solos—his arranging of this huge cast is the main contribution.

 

The most unfortunate moment is Moore’s slow reggae treatment of “Down Under,” which might have been a readily identifiable crowd-pleaser, but instead comes across as unimaginative and badly at odds with the album’s overall beat. The vocals are played straight and the instrumentalists avoid anything notable for a radio-safe four minutes. The concept works much better on “One Thing Leads To Another” as one of the wind players takes over immediately on flute and doesn’t let go throughout a peppery string of phrases. It’s hardly the inspired madness of the Bad Plus, but is a plus rather than a minus to the album.

 

Speaking of inspired madness, some of the better moments of it occur on the hybrid world/funk/whatever collage of “Cheesefrog Funk.” “Groove Messenger” delivers a decent bit of fusion in the style of Miles Davis, who Moore cites as one of his big influences. And the scope of variety can be seen on the rather flute-heavy New Agey “Rain Dance” and the almost mainstream jazz of “Herbie,” a tribute to pianist Herbie Hancock.

 

The CD, released on Moore’s Blue Canoe Records, has a $9 list price, and two songs, “Jamband Express” and “Groove Messenger (The Story of Jazztronica),” are available as free MP3 downloads from Moore’s web site and online vendors such as Amazon.com .

 

Moore has proven a solid player in a variety of settings since appearing on the recording scene in the mid 1990s, and this album ranks well among his releases. Fans wanting to hear him in this setting will likely be satisfied and new listeners of such music will find it worthwhile to at least investigate the free previews. Those wanting to hear his playing will find Alone Together a better and also intriguing bet, since the overdubbing includes unexpected sounds such as percussion generated by tapping on his bass.

 

An Honest Tune – June 2004 June 1, 2004

An Honest Tune June 2004

Vol. 5 No.3, Summer 2004
Review by Fred Adams
An Honest Tune Site

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

Joseph Patrick Moore’s Drum & Bass Society, Volume 1 has got to be one of the most intriguing new releases of the year. From the moment the disc begins, with a new spin on Men at Work’sDown Under,’ it is rapidly apparent that this Tennessee native’s musical odyssey is unlike anything else coming from the South, or anywhere else for that matter.

As much a composer as a bassist, the majority of the songs on this, Moore’s fourth solo release, are (very) original. From beginning to end, the songs are all well written, uniquely arranged, and performed with a confidence and purity of a performer doing something he obviously loves. While all of the material is strong, songs such as ‘Creatures of Conscience’ (featuring guest appearances by ARU alumni Count M’ Butu and Jeff Sipe), ‘Datz It’ (featuring Moore’s former Fiji Mariner band mate Dr. Dan Matrazzo on keyboards, along with Johnny Mosier on guitar), and the ‘Cheese Frog Funk‘ trilogy leave little doubt that this is an artist whose vast talents span many musical genres, from new age to jazz to reggae.

Jamband Express,’ also featuring Jeff Sipe on drums, is another masterfully played, and deceptively titled, track. While the songs name may lead one to expect sounds similar to the bass Moore became known for as he joined Col. Bruce Hampton’s Fiji Mariners, not even a trace of his jam scene influences can be heard here. The track actually sounds more suited to be heard as the theme of a TV show, or movie soundtrack, than something one would hear on today’s jam scene.

While his own compositions are strong, Moore also seems to take great joy, and possess tremendous talents, in rearranging the material of others. Besides the aforementioned ‘Down Under,’ Moore also gives new life to another 80s pop hit, The Fixx’sOne Thing Leads to Another‘ (sung by George and Caroline Pond of Snake Oil Medicine Show), as well as Phish’sHeavy Things‘.

Regardless of the genre he pursues, Moore plays with the class, style and skills of a man whose life is devoted to his craft. While his compositions may never lend themselves to mass commercial appeal or radio play, Drum & Bass Society proves Moore belongs in the elite echelon of today’s newest, and brightest, stars of the new age jazz world.

 

Indie-Music.com – April 2004 April 3, 2004

Artist: Joseph Patrick Moore

CD: Drum & Bass Society Volume 1

Style: Jazz/World/Pop

Quote: “Moore is a creative, mellow, almost trippy songwriter, weaving mysterious sounds and pure funk into this traditionally sophisticated genre.”

By Jennifer Layton

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

I’ve actually learned to enjoy the artsy, avant-garde feel of a group of jazz musicians getting together and letting the music flow, which is the vibe of this CD. I saw myself in a large art studio with paint-splattered hardwood floors and sheet music scattered on tables. The musicians just came in and started playing together, opening the windows to let the night air mix with the strings, woodwinds, and percussion. 

Although Moore and Crew work in several covers, most of these songs are originals. Moore is a creative, mellow, almost trippy songwriter, weaving mysterious sounds and pure funk into this traditionally sophisticated genre. I enjoyed wandering around the swirling, incense-scented, groove-heavy funk of “Jamband Express” and the tribal, rhythmic echo of “Rain Dance.” Mental barriers melt. Time dissolves. I like hanging out with these artists and just listening to them celebrate sound.

The only problem I have is when they start doing covers. I liked two of the originals too much to see their rough edges softened into jazz/world music. Moore has turned Men At Work’s “Down Under” into a woodsy, new age, flowy sound, which doesn’t seem to match lyrics about odd characters and drunken barfing. And The Fixx’s original version of “One Thing Leads To Another” had a perfectly jagged guitar riff that matched Cy Curnin’s sharp, aggressive vocal. These two songs do not lend themselves to jazz.

Having said that, I just noticed in the liner notes that one of the musicians on the “Down Under” remake is playing a pizza box with brushes. I think Colin Hay would get a kick out of that. 

 

CelebrityCafe.com – March 2004 March 4, 2004

 

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

 

At first, I admit I practically threw this CD to the side. It came in a beaten envelope redirected from an address six years out of date. The CD itself looks like its seen better days and after being redirected based on the condition of the envelope I could have sworn that it was a bomb. Then I saw that this jazz band covered “Down Under” by Men at Work. Okay, they also covered Phish and the Fixx, but it was the Men at Work that struck me. Who the heck would cover that song? Especially as jazz. 

Then the vocals started, and the beat, and the drums, and the bass. The song blew me away more than the original. Simply incredible. I’m glad that the album finally made it to us, and now I repeat this one song ad nauseum throughout the office. 

Reviewer: Michael 
Reviewer’s Rating: 7.5

 

HotBands.com – March 2004 March 1, 2004

hotbands.com

Joseph Patrick Moore’s Drum & Bass Society Vol 1. – CD Review
By Patrick Ferris

 

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

 

 

Joseph Patrick Moore aka JPM is a bass virtuoso originally from Knoxville, Tennessee, now residing in Atlanta, Georgia. The winner of multiple national awards and scholarships for music excellence, JPM’s musical track record reads like a who’s who of the jazz world, and has made him one of the most sought-after studio bassists on the East Coast.

JPM’s most recent CD, Drum & Bass Society Vol 1. is an eclectic selection of arrangements in the genre of fusion jazz. JPM has assembled some of the finest studio heavies to create what I would call ‘A Musician’s Album’. Drum & Bass Society Vol 1. might be beyond the intellectual grasp of the average Joe, but is ideal for musicians wanting to hear cutting edge fusion arrangements and precision instrumentation with an emphasis on JPM’s incredible bass chops. Influences from Miles Davis, Herbie Hancock and Weather Report are felt as well as elements of hip-hop and sampling. There is even a concept feel that gives a new spin on this particular flavor of acid-jazz fusion.

For more information on Joseph Patrick Moore’s Drum & Bass Society, check out his website:

 

An Honest Tune – August 2002 August 13, 2002

An Honest Tune August 2002
August 2002
Vol. 4, number 1
Review by Tom Speed

An Honest Tune Website

Alone Together

Alone Together

Though best known for his turns as the bass player for Fiji Mariners and BlueGround UnderGrass, Joseph Patrick Moore presents here on his third solo release nothing but his bass-fifteen tracks that touch on jazz, rock, and classical music. Most of the tracks were written by Moore but he also includes some interesting cover selections such as the Police’s MASOKO TANGA. Alone Together features Moore on upright acoustic and electric basses with overdubs and samples and whatever else it takes to make it work. Listening to this record, one gets the feeling of being invited into Moore’s living room for a long musical conversation that lasts well into the night.

It’s a must for bass players but is also an excellent record that captures an amazing performer and his craft.

 

Independent Music – May 2002 May 22, 2002

Independent Music – May 2002
Review by John Scalzi

Alone Together

Alone Together

Bassist Joseph Patrick Moore has put together a contemporary music album of all bass – not just bass as the highlighted instrument, but all bass all the time. However, he mixes up the bass sounds by using upright acoustic bass, picked and bowed, eletric bass, and electronically processed bass to create a whole spectrum of noise, in several genres of music, from ambient-like to jazzy. At its best (album opener WATERFALL) it creates a sonically-arresting space. At its least effective, it’s elevator music (note to JPM: Nice of you to cover Bobby McFerrin’s DRIVE, but while you are a fine bassist, you’re really not a singer). Fortunately, there are  rather more good moments than bad ones.  Bassists in particular should enjoy this album as example of what their uderappreciated instrument can do, the rest of us can simply enjoy Moore’s ability to turn a single instrument into an entire band’s worth of sound

 

Homegrown Music – May 2002 May 21, 2002

Homegrown Music May 2002
Dancing Tree Newsletter May 21, 2002
Review by Bryan Rodgers

Alone Together

Alone Together

Joseph Patrick MooreAlone Together CD– Outstanding solo work from this master of the low end!  This is truly a solo bass CD, with Moore using only bass to create his visions. Loops, solos, and complex compositions dot this enhanced CD, which features a video of Moore performing DRIVE, and much more. Moore is best know for hist stints with BlueGround UnderGrass
and Fiji Mariners.

Your jaw will be on the floor….this guy simply tears it up!

 

An Honest Tune – June 2001 June 21, 2001

An Honest Tune, June/2001
Review by Bryan Irby

Soul Cloud

Soul Cloud

New BlueGround UnderGrass bassist Joseph Moore (ex-Fiji Mariners/Planet Zambee) has just released a second solo album on his own independent label MMP. SOUL CLOUD continues in the same contemporary jazz vein as his 1996 release NEVER NEVER LAND. While much of this material is a bit too smooth for my jazz tastes there are some definite funky highlights like ASHES TO ASHES, MUMPHIS COSANOSTRA, and DATZ IT, all 3 which feature Yonrico Scott (Derek Trucks Band) on drums and Jimmy Herring on guitar. The simpler, bass-centric tunes on the album are also among the best tracks. Pause#3 is a bass, sitar & drum free-jazz piece dedicated to Miles Davis Drummer Tony Williams (Pause 1 and 2 on NEVER NEVER LAND were dedicated to Miles Davis and Jaco Pastorius). BIG BUTT BASS is exactly that: in-yer-face solo slap bass, and there’s a nice bass & saxophone take on Led Zepplin’s GOING TO CALIFORNIA. These tunes and the hidden track ANOTHER DAY ANOTHER TIME ( a beautiful rainy-day-in-Memphis piece) outshine the title track and a cover of DUST IN THE WIND which I find unlistenable.

Catch Joseph Patrick Moore on tour with BlueGround UnderGrass or his own group.

 

Commercial Appeal – January 21, 2001 January 21, 2001

Commercial Appeal, January 21, 2001
Memphis, TN
Review by Bill Ellis

Soul Cloud

Soul Cloud

Based in Atlanta, former Memphis Groovetet bass player Joseph Patrick Moore funks up his considerable jazz chops on SOULCLOUD which lies in the Yellowjackets/Weather Report vein through with a more rocking jam band attack at times (the highlight MUMPHIS COSONOSTRA). Moore even arranges Led Zeppelin’s GOIN’ TO CALIFORNIA – a gentle bass sax duet – and Kansas’s Dust in the Wind which, as the record’s one misstep, is a pretty awkward one. The smooth fusion compositions by Moore and keyboardist Frank Amato benefit from the leader’s melodic grooves and give room for numerous fretboard workouts a la inspiration Jaco Pastorius. The disc’s horn players equally shine. Not many folks can walk this familar yet demanding walk. Moore, a member of Col. Bruce Hampton & the Fiji Mainers in its final year- does and convincingly so.

Catch him in town February 3rd, 2001 at Legends with BlueGround UnderGrass on Beale. Street.

 

AllAboutJazz.com – December 2000 December 1, 2000

 

AllAboutJazz.com
by Todd S. Jenkins

Soul Cloud

Soul Cloud

Versatile Atlanta-based bassist Moore’s new album is packed with fun grooves from the word go. His technique and ideas are steeped in the electric bass developments of the past thirty years, but with a fresh contemporary edge.

The band fries up a hot passel of funk on track #1. The horns are hot and deep into the boogie, Moore’s envelope-filtered bass adds a Bootsy Collins vibe, and Aquarium Rescue Unit guitarist Jimmy Herring tempers the sauce with a cupful of hot bluesiness. Tracks #2 and #5 give the expected nod to Jaco; track #3 begins with thumping worthy of Marcus Miller and evolves into pretty double-stops. These tracks especially flaunt Moore’s studio-quality chops.

Though most of their names are unfamiliar, Moore’s sidemen are complementary, empathetic and well chosen. Pianist Bill Anschell lays down a Ramsey Lewis-style groove on #7 and ‘Buzz’ Amato boots the organ around the floor before trumpeter Vance Thompson enters with soulful lyricism. Moore closes the disc with covers of classic songs by Led Zeppelin and Kansas. The former is driven smoothly along by Moore’s taut harmonics and fingerstyle melodicism, while the latter floats on an unexpectedly successful Latin jazz beat. Palmer Williams‘ vocals on the last tune are notably fluid and enjoyable. Joseph Patrick Moore is definitely a talent worth hearing, and this well-made disc will be of particular interest to electric bass aficionados.

 
Track listing: Datz It; Ashes To Ashes; Big Butt Bass; Soulcloud; Pause #3; Mumphis Cosanostra; Cosmic Dance; Going To California; Dust In The Wind.

Personnel: Moore, acoustic and electric basses, shaker; Jimmy Herring, guitar; Yonrico Scott, Phillip Smith, drums; Bill Anschell, Bob Marbach, piano; Frank “Buzz” Amato, keyboards; Vance Thompson, trumpet and flugelhorn; Stan Cherednik, alto and soprano saxes; Bryan Lopes, tenor sax; Palmer Williams Jr., vocals.

Style: Fusion/Progressive Rock 
Published: December 01, 2000

 

Performer Magazine – December 2000

Performer Magazine, December 2000
Southeast
Review by K. Harris

Performer Magazine

Soul Cloud

Soul Cloud

Now, Joseph Patrick Moore’s Soul Cloud is a smooth and relaxing album with just a touch of funk. While listening to this album, the following is the picture that it created. If you will, please envision that you and your girl (or significant other) are sitting in a cozy, dimly lit (like a Love Jones atmosphere) couples restaurant as you two occupy a corner. Across the room on a small, low stage, there is a band playing as you two talk and laugh. Soul Cloud does not actually create a candle lit evening, but it does create a comfortable, friendly, social vibe that might make a room give quiet applause with a catcall and possibly a whistle after the band’s set. You pay attention to the music, rather than just getting lost into their dates. This is mainly an instrumental jazz collective that displays everything from string instruments to horns, with a few extras in between. Moore and company get down with songs like DATZ ITASHES TO ASHES, MUMPHUS COSANOSTRA, displaying nothing but musical talent.  Kudos to the sax player that made his instrument wail, wallow, and cry in COSMIC DANCE. It was so impressive that it had to be rewound to ensure I heard what I thought I heard. Also JPM shows skills that were second to none in GOING TO CALIFORNIA.

To sum the album up, Soul Cloud is well-written, exquisitely produced, and fabulously performed. If this project is any indication, Joseph Patrick Moore will be delighting music listeners for many years to come.

 

Bassically.net – October 2000 October 3, 2000

Bassically.net, October 2000
Review by Cliff Engel

Soul Cloud

Soul Cloud

Joseph Patrick Moore, former Col. Bruce Hampton bassist, released SOULCLOUD, his second solo instrumental jazz cd on October 10, 2000. Soulcloud is the follow-up effort to Moore’s 1996 independently released debut, NEVER NEVER LAND. As a freelance bassist, Moore has displayed the diversity of his musical talents in a wide array of musical genres including various form of jazz, rock, and blues music to name just a few. On SoulCloud Moore continues to demonstrate his versatility in a number of group settings including solo, duo, trio, and full blown ensemble settings. Moore, a multi-instrumentalist, switches seemingly effortlessly between fretted and fretless electric and upright basses.

Right from its onset you’ll notice that SoulCloud is an extremely well produced offering featuring Moore’s bass talents well in front of the mix (the way recordings ought to be). On a number of the tunes I detected the funky vibes of the Col. Bruce Hampton sound which I’m certain Moore picked up during the time he spent as a member of Hampton’s own Fiji Mariners and Planet Zambee ensembles. For those of you not familiar with the Col., it was he that helped launch the career of the now renowned bass artist, Oteil Burbridge. Also those of you well-versed with the Hampton library should immediately recognize the sounds of another Hampton sideman, guitarist Jimmy Herring, who appears as one of the many featured guest performers on SoulCloud.

Moore opens SoulCloud with a tight horn arrangement on DATZ IT (my favorite piece) and reveals his impeccable technique on acoustic and electric basses. Moore then presents us with the first of five original compositions with the fretless sounds of ASHES TO ASHES. Besides the phat funk grooves which Moore proves he can undoubtedly handle with ease, Moore takes center stage for a brief moment to exhibit his tasty solo slap chops on BIG BUTT BASS (very impressive indeed) before neatly sequeing into the album’s title track. Moore shifts to a trio format of electric bass, drums and sitar on PAUSE #3, an interesting piece dedicated to the late great Tony Williams.  Next Moore offers you the listener the funky sounds of the very hip MUMPHIS COSANOSTRA. Then Moore continues to expand upon his deep-in-the-pocket bassmanship within the soulful sounds of COSMIC DANCE, another Moore original composition. Finally, Moore rounds out SoulCloud with two cover tunes, Led Zeppelin’s GOING TO CALIFORNIA is a brilliant duo arrrangement featuring the unlikely combination of electric bass and soprano saxophone. However, this is primarily a solo bass arrangement consisting of arpeggiated melodic, harmonic, and chordal content. I like how Moore tints the color of this piece with the short sax section that gracefully weaves in and out of the bass content. Moore then presents the listener with a jazzed up version of DUST IN THE WIND that highlights Moore’s upright skills during the outro solo. For those of you that discover the disc’s hidden track, you’ll hear the eerie harmonic-laden sound of ANOTHER DAY ANOTHER TIME. A solo bass piece recorded on a rainy afternoon in Memphis, Tennessee back in 1994.

Bottom Line: If you have never heard the talent of Joseph Patrick Moore, it is just a matter of time before you will.

 

Hits Magazine – September 30th, 1996 September 30, 1996

Hits Magazine , September 30th, 1996

Never Never Land

Never Never Land

 

Received a very interesting album by bassist Joseph Patrick Moore, whose Never Never Land (MMP) contains choice and thoughtful cuts that cover a wide variety of jazz idioms. Jazz/NAC formats will find a variety of tunes to bring to listeners, including UP THE STAIRS, CORNER OF THE WORLDSEX IN SPACE and the title cut. And those are just the start…

 

 
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