Joseph Patrick Moore's

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An Honest Tune – June 2001 June 21, 2001

An Honest Tune, June/2001
Review by Bryan Irby

Soul Cloud

Soul Cloud

New BlueGround UnderGrass bassist Joseph Moore (ex-Fiji Mariners/Planet Zambee) has just released a second solo album on his own independent label MMP. SOUL CLOUD continues in the same contemporary jazz vein as his 1996 release NEVER NEVER LAND. While much of this material is a bit too smooth for my jazz tastes there are some definite funky highlights like ASHES TO ASHES, MUMPHIS COSANOSTRA, and DATZ IT, all 3 which feature Yonrico Scott (Derek Trucks Band) on drums and Jimmy Herring on guitar. The simpler, bass-centric tunes on the album are also among the best tracks. Pause#3 is a bass, sitar & drum free-jazz piece dedicated to Miles Davis Drummer Tony Williams (Pause 1 and 2 on NEVER NEVER LAND were dedicated to Miles Davis and Jaco Pastorius). BIG BUTT BASS is exactly that: in-yer-face solo slap bass, and there’s a nice bass & saxophone take on Led Zepplin’s GOING TO CALIFORNIA. These tunes and the hidden track ANOTHER DAY ANOTHER TIME ( a beautiful rainy-day-in-Memphis piece) outshine the title track and a cover of DUST IN THE WIND which I find unlistenable.

Catch Joseph Patrick Moore on tour with BlueGround UnderGrass or his own group.

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Commercial Appeal – January 21, 2001 January 21, 2001

Commercial Appeal, January 21, 2001
Memphis, TN
Review by Bill Ellis

Soul Cloud

Soul Cloud

Based in Atlanta, former Memphis Groovetet bass player Joseph Patrick Moore funks up his considerable jazz chops on SOULCLOUD which lies in the Yellowjackets/Weather Report vein through with a more rocking jam band attack at times (the highlight MUMPHIS COSONOSTRA). Moore even arranges Led Zeppelin’s GOIN’ TO CALIFORNIA – a gentle bass sax duet – and Kansas’s Dust in the Wind which, as the record’s one misstep, is a pretty awkward one. The smooth fusion compositions by Moore and keyboardist Frank Amato benefit from the leader’s melodic grooves and give room for numerous fretboard workouts a la inspiration Jaco Pastorius. The disc’s horn players equally shine. Not many folks can walk this familar yet demanding walk. Moore, a member of Col. Bruce Hampton & the Fiji Mainers in its final year- does and convincingly so.

Catch him in town February 3rd, 2001 at Legends with BlueGround UnderGrass on Beale. Street.

 

Performer Magazine – December 2000 December 1, 2000

Performer Magazine, December 2000
Southeast
Review by K. Harris

Performer Magazine

Soul Cloud

Soul Cloud

Now, Joseph Patrick Moore’s Soul Cloud is a smooth and relaxing album with just a touch of funk. While listening to this album, the following is the picture that it created. If you will, please envision that you and your girl (or significant other) are sitting in a cozy, dimly lit (like a Love Jones atmosphere) couples restaurant as you two occupy a corner. Across the room on a small, low stage, there is a band playing as you two talk and laugh. Soul Cloud does not actually create a candle lit evening, but it does create a comfortable, friendly, social vibe that might make a room give quiet applause with a catcall and possibly a whistle after the band’s set. You pay attention to the music, rather than just getting lost into their dates. This is mainly an instrumental jazz collective that displays everything from string instruments to horns, with a few extras in between. Moore and company get down with songs like DATZ ITASHES TO ASHES, MUMPHUS COSANOSTRA, displaying nothing but musical talent.  Kudos to the sax player that made his instrument wail, wallow, and cry in COSMIC DANCE. It was so impressive that it had to be rewound to ensure I heard what I thought I heard. Also JPM shows skills that were second to none in GOING TO CALIFORNIA.

To sum the album up, Soul Cloud is well-written, exquisitely produced, and fabulously performed. If this project is any indication, Joseph Patrick Moore will be delighting music listeners for many years to come.

 

 
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