Joseph Patrick Moore's

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BassCast.com 2006 Interview/Co-Host July 13, 2006

BassCast

Bass Feature/Interview/Co-Host JPM – 2006 – Click Here

You Can Dowload This Podcast Here

Feature CD: “Decade: 1996 – 2005” by Joseph Patrick Moore.
Step Back In Time: “Stanley Clarke” by Stanley Clarke.
We also catch up on a stack of great bass oriented new releases.
The co-host is Joseph Patrick Moore.

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Sea Of Tranquility – January 18, 2006 January 18, 2006

 

 

Live in 05'

Live in 05'

Bassist Joseph Patrick Moore’s latest album Live in 05 is a fun and spirited jazz-fusion collection of songs recorded at This House Rocks in Atlanta, Georgia on April 2nd, 2005. Moore has been busy over the last few years, putting out a few albums of his own as well as appearing on various other artist’s recordings. Here, he and his crack band of Al Smith on keyboards, drummer Jon Chalden, EWI player Al Mcspadden, and percussionist Emrah Kotan really give a five performance on eleven tracks of smokin’ and funky fusion, melodic cool jazz, and progressive tinged improvisations. 

Moore himself is a very smooth player with some serious chops, whether he is laying down deep grooves or lean melodic solos on electric, fretless, or double bass. Fans of Victor Bailey, Gary Willis, John Pattitucci, Stanley Clarke, and Marcus Miller, will instantly dig Moore’s energetic style. Although there are plenty of great bass solos on the album, the live setting affords his bandmates to also get in on the action, especially keyboard player Smith, who launches into a wild synth frenzy on the funky “Gypsy Moon Father Sun”. He also provides a nice melodic foundation in which Moore can dig into some serious popping bass lines on the light jazz piece “Fall”. Drummers will love the percussion/drum spotlight “Drum Dance”, which allows Chalden and Kotan some room to show off before the song segues into the fine “Datz It (version 2005)”, a song with plenty of funk bass melodies and 70’s styled electric piano.

Ultimately it comes down to compositions, and Moore is no slouch in that department. These are all memorable tunes with catchy melodies, which go along just fine with the solid chops of the band. So if you in the mood for some well played and melodic modern jazz fusion, you can’t go wrong with Live in 05.
Track Listing 
1. SoulCloud 
2. Mystery 
3. Prayer of Solitude 
4. Chief Dagga 
5. Gypsy Moon Father Sun 
6. Bless You 
7. Fall 
8. Bebop Charlie 
9. What? 
10. Drum Dance 
11. Datz It (version 2005)

Added: January 18th 2006
Reviewer: Pete Pardo
Score: 

 

Iowa State Daily – March 2004 March 24, 2004

Joseph Patrick Moore’s Drum and Bass Society
“Volume 1” (Blue Canoe)
Compare to: Stanley Clarke, Fredalba

Review b y  — Dan Hopper

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

Joseph Patrick Moore has once again proven his versatility as a bass player, arranger and composer. Unfortunately, his music is all over the board stylistically, which may lower its appeal.

“Volume 1” is layered with diverse songs, all of which contain complex musical patterns. Moore and his backing musicians groove as hard as George Clinton and Parliament Funkadelic at times, and Moore’s skills on bass are definitely comparable to Funkadelic’s Bootsy Collins.

The songs have a light-hearted enough tone to fit with any jazz listener’s taste, but the superb backbeats give most of the songs a Latin and funk feel.

There is even a hint of some Caribbean and Arabian influences found throughout. “Down Under”, the leadoff track, could not have received a better title. The music sounds like it could fit perfectly with a TV advertisement for a South Pacific Island’s vacation getaway.

The music features shakers, congas, Udu drums, a mandolin, a flute and even a pizza box scraped, tapped and swirled with jazz brushes. The choice of instruments is innovative, though slightly unconventional.

“Ghost Town” starts out with a few bone-chilling screams. The lyrics mention a ghost town, but the music brings images of deserts and sandstorms with a little enchantment placed upon them.

“Creatures of Conscience,” a Tony Williams composition, has the strongest groove and features an extremely syncopated jazz-funk drum pattern. Jeff Sipe‘s tom fills, high-hat work and borderline-genius drum solo in this song are admirable, considering his name is one not generally mentioned outside of jazz and funk musician circles.

“Creatures Of Conscience” is a good song, but it doesn’t seem to fit with the rest of Moore’s album. He is a bassist and the track obviously features the drums. The bass is barely noticeable.

This is without question a “musician’s album,” meaning the people who would buy it would most likely be musicians who are deeply versed in complicated musical styles or those with a deep love for groove-oriented music or appreciation in general.

 

JazzUSA.Com – November 2000 November 20, 2000

JazzUsa.com
by Raymond Redmond

Soul Cloud

Soul Cloud

This second album from bassist Joseph Patrick Moore is good. Not superior, but solid. The first song Datz It starts out a little weak, but by the end it is full and jumping. Then comes Ashes to Ashes and you begin to think there may be something here. The keyboard work of Bill Anschell and Vance Thompson’s horn work shine here, as they do throughout the CD, and Jimmy Herring plays a wicked guitar solo in the middle.

After Big Butt Bass, a 27 second song/solo by Moore on his bass, comes the title tune. Perhaps there is a melodic harmonic intent here, but it gets by me. I found the song to be interesting but pretty atonal. It has some great horn work in it, but it would not be my choice for a title tune. After another interlude, this one a 1-1/2 minute drum-centric piece dedicated to Tony Williams, Moore comes back strong and funky on Mumphis Cosanostra. Sort of retro, this is one of the better songs on the CD, and it again features strong horn lines and some groovin keyboard lines by Anschell.

The bass throughout the album is strong and rhythmic, Moore definitely has his own style. Cosmic Dance  is even more retro with it’s Chicago-esque horn lines and hammond-ish keyboards. Goin’ to California is the obligatory ‘this is my album and I’m gonna do a mostly solo song to show off my chops’ song. Stanley Clarke does it all the time, and Moore is good enough to pull it off. The CD ends up with a lively rendition of the classic pop tune ‘Dust in the Wind’, which has more of those odd harmonies that bothered me on the title track. There is also a hiddentrack at the ten minutes mark o f ‘Dust’ (which fades after three minutes or so). It’s a rainy day kind of thing that is better than some of the noted songs on the CD.

With Soul Cloud, Joseph Patrick Moore has brought together some good musicians and put together a release that is a step up into the big time. A little more polish here and there, less of that odd harmony and Joseph Patrick Moore will be a major player in the Jazz world.

 

The Commercial Appeal – September 28th, 1996 September 28, 1996

The Commercial Appeal, September 28th, 1996
Review by Bill Ellis
Memphis, TN
The Commercial Appeal

Never Never Land

Never Never Land

If ever a case could be made for an ongoing jazz scene in Memphis, Moore’s disc is it. The bass player’s hand-picked ensemble is a roll call of the best of the best, including Jim Spake, Carl Wolfe, trumpeters Scott Thompson and Bill Mobley and clarinetist Lannie McMillian. Heard as well is Hammond B-3 organ phenom Charlie Wood and DDT Big Band singer Kelly Hurt, who adds a silky scat to one tune.

That Moore could gather such esteemed talent for his self-produced disc speaks volumes of the jazz bassman’s talents. Moore, who has been featured in notable guitar magazines, plays around town these days with the Memphis Groovetet. His funky bass lines will bring to mind Stanley Clarke and Jaco Pastorius, which is not bad company. He even does an all-bass arrangement of Coltrane’s Giant Steps that makes such recent bass arranged efforts by Rob Wasserman puerile in comparison.

Full of melodic invention and deft charts, Moore’s own compositions are much more than excuses to jam (something Pastorius wasn’t always sensitive to). Moore’s locally made NNL can hold its own with any national contemporary jazz record on the market today and deserves major label distribution.

 

 
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