Joseph Patrick Moore's

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Bass Guitar Magazine (UK) – 2004 November 21, 2004

BassGuitar Magazine (UK) November 2004
Review by Andy Long
for ThirdBass. Commisioned by Bass Guitar Magazine.

Bass Guitar Magazine Site
Bass Guitar Magazine Issue 14 

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

A surprisingly mellow version of Men At Work’sDown Under‘ opens this latest project from Atlanta based session man Moore. It’s an colourful album that takes a tour around some of his influences, for instance the opening track is followed by a jazz arrangement of ‘Ghost Town’ by The Specials and the songs of Tony Williams, Phish and The Fixx are also to be found. His own compositions are a cocktail of funk, jazz and soul shaken and stirred by a multitude of musicians. ‘Jamband Express‘ has a solid blues/funk feel with an irresistible groove and his tribute to Herbie Hancock, ‘Herbie‘ is a showcase for some outstanding soloing, Adam Nitti pops up on this track as an added bonus. Moore was recently named as one of the 100 greatest jazz bassist by Digital Dream Door and this album is the lastest testament to that achievement.

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CleverJoe.com – May 2004 May 11, 2004

CleverJoe.com may 2004
CleverJoe’s indie band top picks

http://www.cleverjoe.com/
http://www.cleverjoe.com/newsletter_may_2004.html
Drum & Bass Society – Joseph Patrick Moore

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1


Although CleverJoe generally tries to select artists from the abundant good music within the thriving Canadian indie music scene, once in awhile a CD comes across his desk that really kicks his ass (which is somewhat strange because CleverJoe, one dimensional as he is, has no ass, nor for that matter a desk).

A few weeks ago, Joe was rolling along the 401, whistling a tune vaguely inspired by a song Bob Dylan once borrowed. The CD arrived a couple weeks earlier and busy as he is, Clever had not read the accompanying press release. So with no preconceptions, he reached over and popped in Joseph Patrick’s Moore’ Drum & Bass Society CD, pressed play and rolled the window down a crack.

There’s no looking back baby.

Mmmm… sweet, jazzy and intelligent, this is a great CD that goes on evolving each time it’s listened to. A mostly instrumental CD, featuring a healthy dose of uniquely arranged cover tunes backed by a solid live band with funkadelic bass, percussion, horns, woodwinds and strings.

With a peppering of electronica and soundscapes, Drum & Bass Society wanders through some unique covers of tunes by Phish, Tony Williams, Men at Work, The Specials and the Fixx. A few songs do feature a vocalist, most notably Temple Passmore on the opening track ‘Down Under‘.


Arranged by Joseph Patrick Moore, a 34 year old bassist from Knoxville, TN, Moore’s influences include Herbie Hancock, John Coltrane, The Police and Charlie Parker. Traces of all can be heard throughout the extended jams and instrument solos on the hour long CD.

The music definitely grows on you in a laid back sort of way . CleverJoe recommends you do yourself a favour and high tail it to JPM’s web site and have a taste of some Drum & Bass Society yourself. Your day will be better for it. http://www.josephpatrickmoore.com

CleverJoe Tip: This is road trip music at it’s best.

 

Creative Loafing – April 2004 April 5, 2004

Creative Loafing April 2004

Creative Loafing-vibes-sit and spin
Charlotte, NC March 2004
Review by Samir Shukla

Creative Loafing Site (Charlotte, NC)

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

 

Joseph Patrick Moore has served as a member of Col. Bruce Hampton’s Fiji Mariners and Blueground Undergrass. The bassist and multi-insrumentalist, currently based in Atlanta, produces solo records and also appears on a numerous projects as a sideman. Moore has a knack for bringing disparate musicians together into a collective that somehow manages to click. In VOLUME 1, the guest coax Moore’s seven original compositions into uptempo pop, contemporary jazz, and world fusion. There is also exotica in RAINDANCE, funk with CHEESEFROG FUNK, and groove-rock hints in HEAVY THINGS.  Sure, there are tracks that would be home in a lounge somewhere, lurkin in obscurity, but most of the record works quite well. The engaging takes on several covers include The Fixx’s ONE THING LEADS TO ANOTHER, where George and Caroline Pond from Snake Oil Medicine Show add their own obtuse dimension. The Specials GHOST TOW gets a jazzy treatment and covers of Phish, Men at Work and Tony Williams also get refurbished. Moore’s bass lines are supple, funky and don’t overwhelm the rest of the crew playing slide guitars, violin, horns, woodwinds and mandolin. His bass expecially shines in a dedication to Herbie Hancock simply entitled HERBIE.

Track to burn: GHOST TOWN
Grade: B

 

Iowa State Daily – March 2004 March 24, 2004

Joseph Patrick Moore’s Drum and Bass Society
“Volume 1” (Blue Canoe)
Compare to: Stanley Clarke, Fredalba

Review b y  — Dan Hopper

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

Joseph Patrick Moore's Drum & Bass Society - Volume 1

Joseph Patrick Moore has once again proven his versatility as a bass player, arranger and composer. Unfortunately, his music is all over the board stylistically, which may lower its appeal.

“Volume 1” is layered with diverse songs, all of which contain complex musical patterns. Moore and his backing musicians groove as hard as George Clinton and Parliament Funkadelic at times, and Moore’s skills on bass are definitely comparable to Funkadelic’s Bootsy Collins.

The songs have a light-hearted enough tone to fit with any jazz listener’s taste, but the superb backbeats give most of the songs a Latin and funk feel.

There is even a hint of some Caribbean and Arabian influences found throughout. “Down Under”, the leadoff track, could not have received a better title. The music sounds like it could fit perfectly with a TV advertisement for a South Pacific Island’s vacation getaway.

The music features shakers, congas, Udu drums, a mandolin, a flute and even a pizza box scraped, tapped and swirled with jazz brushes. The choice of instruments is innovative, though slightly unconventional.

“Ghost Town” starts out with a few bone-chilling screams. The lyrics mention a ghost town, but the music brings images of deserts and sandstorms with a little enchantment placed upon them.

“Creatures of Conscience,” a Tony Williams composition, has the strongest groove and features an extremely syncopated jazz-funk drum pattern. Jeff Sipe‘s tom fills, high-hat work and borderline-genius drum solo in this song are admirable, considering his name is one not generally mentioned outside of jazz and funk musician circles.

“Creatures Of Conscience” is a good song, but it doesn’t seem to fit with the rest of Moore’s album. He is a bassist and the track obviously features the drums. The bass is barely noticeable.

This is without question a “musician’s album,” meaning the people who would buy it would most likely be musicians who are deeply versed in complicated musical styles or those with a deep love for groove-oriented music or appreciation in general.

 

Smother.net – March 2004 March 7, 2004

Joseph Patrick Moore - Drum & Bass Society Vol. 1 Editor's Pick

Joseph Patrick Moore — Drum & Bass Society Vol. 1

Starting things off with “Down Under” by Men at Work, Joseph Patrick Moore also retools work by The Fixx, The Specials (“Ghost Town”), Phish (“Heavy Things”), and Tony Williams (“Creatures of Conscience”), while offering seven originals. I really dig his funky cover of The Fixx’s “One Thing Leads to Another”, which makes you remember how much great music the ‘80’s and early ‘90s had to offer. His style is jazzy progressive rock with a nod to world and funk. His bass playing is masterful and bouncy with lively tones.

Reviewed by:  J-Sin

 

An Honest Tune – June 2001 June 21, 2001

An Honest Tune, June/2001
Review by Bryan Irby

Soul Cloud

Soul Cloud

New BlueGround UnderGrass bassist Joseph Moore (ex-Fiji Mariners/Planet Zambee) has just released a second solo album on his own independent label MMP. SOUL CLOUD continues in the same contemporary jazz vein as his 1996 release NEVER NEVER LAND. While much of this material is a bit too smooth for my jazz tastes there are some definite funky highlights like ASHES TO ASHES, MUMPHIS COSANOSTRA, and DATZ IT, all 3 which feature Yonrico Scott (Derek Trucks Band) on drums and Jimmy Herring on guitar. The simpler, bass-centric tunes on the album are also among the best tracks. Pause#3 is a bass, sitar & drum free-jazz piece dedicated to Miles Davis Drummer Tony Williams (Pause 1 and 2 on NEVER NEVER LAND were dedicated to Miles Davis and Jaco Pastorius). BIG BUTT BASS is exactly that: in-yer-face solo slap bass, and there’s a nice bass & saxophone take on Led Zepplin’s GOING TO CALIFORNIA. These tunes and the hidden track ANOTHER DAY ANOTHER TIME ( a beautiful rainy-day-in-Memphis piece) outshine the title track and a cover of DUST IN THE WIND which I find unlistenable.

Catch Joseph Patrick Moore on tour with BlueGround UnderGrass or his own group.

 

JazzUSA.Com – November 2000 November 20, 2000

JazzUsa.com
by Raymond Redmond

Soul Cloud

Soul Cloud

This second album from bassist Joseph Patrick Moore is good. Not superior, but solid. The first song Datz It starts out a little weak, but by the end it is full and jumping. Then comes Ashes to Ashes and you begin to think there may be something here. The keyboard work of Bill Anschell and Vance Thompson’s horn work shine here, as they do throughout the CD, and Jimmy Herring plays a wicked guitar solo in the middle.

After Big Butt Bass, a 27 second song/solo by Moore on his bass, comes the title tune. Perhaps there is a melodic harmonic intent here, but it gets by me. I found the song to be interesting but pretty atonal. It has some great horn work in it, but it would not be my choice for a title tune. After another interlude, this one a 1-1/2 minute drum-centric piece dedicated to Tony Williams, Moore comes back strong and funky on Mumphis Cosanostra. Sort of retro, this is one of the better songs on the CD, and it again features strong horn lines and some groovin keyboard lines by Anschell.

The bass throughout the album is strong and rhythmic, Moore definitely has his own style. Cosmic Dance  is even more retro with it’s Chicago-esque horn lines and hammond-ish keyboards. Goin’ to California is the obligatory ‘this is my album and I’m gonna do a mostly solo song to show off my chops’ song. Stanley Clarke does it all the time, and Moore is good enough to pull it off. The CD ends up with a lively rendition of the classic pop tune ‘Dust in the Wind’, which has more of those odd harmonies that bothered me on the title track. There is also a hiddentrack at the ten minutes mark o f ‘Dust’ (which fades after three minutes or so). It’s a rainy day kind of thing that is better than some of the noted songs on the CD.

With Soul Cloud, Joseph Patrick Moore has brought together some good musicians and put together a release that is a step up into the big time. A little more polish here and there, less of that odd harmony and Joseph Patrick Moore will be a major player in the Jazz world.

 

 
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